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The Ten Most Deadliest Snakes - Steve Irwin
Steve Irwin
Join Steve Irwin as he treks through Australia on a mission to find the world's ten most venomous snakes and to educate us on how we can peacefully cohabit with them
Rate:  (3.4)
African Spurred Tortoise (Geochelone sulcata)
The African Spurred Tortoise (Geochelone sulcata) is a species of tortoise which inhabits the southern edge of the Sahara desert, in northern Africa. Their diet provides them with water, and they coat their skin with mud when available to cool off. When mud wallows are not available, they retreat to cooler burrows. Spurred tortoises are important to deserts because their burrows provide shelter for other animals. They do not hibernate, like many other types of tortoises, due to their natural environment being so close to the equator. They love to dig, and make very long burrows, often much dam...
Rate:  (4.1)
Location: Turtles
Tennessee Walking Horse
Over one hundred years ago, in the Middle Basin of Tennessee, a unique breed was created - the Tennessee Walking Horse. The early settlers of this region who came from Virginia, the Carolinas and other surrounding states, brought with them fine Standardbreds, Morgans, Thoroughbreds, Canadian and Narrangansett Pacers. By combining the traits of these great horse families, the foundation was laid for the Tennessee Walker who developed distinctive qualities of its own.
Rate:  (4.2)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Mustang
American feral horse, BLM (Bureau of Land Management) horse, Range horse
The Mustang is a feral horse found now in the western United States. The name Mustang comes from the Spanish word mesteño or monstenco meaning wild or stray. Originally these were Spanish horses or their descendants but over the years they became a mix of numerous breeds. These were the horses which changed the lives of the Native Americans living in or near the Great Plains. As European settlers came farther west they brought their horses with them. Some were lost to Indian raids, others were freed as wild stallions tore down fences to add the tame mares tn his herd or tame horse escap...
Rate:  (3.5)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Colorado Ranger Horse
The Colorado Rangerbred was named for its Colorado High Plains origin. Despite appearances, the Rangerbred is not a type of Appaloosa. It has its own unique heritage. However, many Rangerbreds are double-registered with the Appaloosa Horse Clubs of both the United States and Canada. There is a one in ten chance that an Appaloosa is a "Lost" Rangerbred. The Rangerhorse was bred for cow savvy and performance capabilities. The Colorado Ranger Horse Association has no color preference. Some of CRHA registered horses display Appaloosa Characteristics and coloration and some do not. “Color is...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
German Pinscher
The progenitor of better-known Pinscher breeds, the German Pinscher is an old breed that can trace back its lineage to the German Bibarhund of the seventh century and the Tanner of the 14th century. In the 1600s, dogs with this ancestry or type were mixed with Black and Tan Terriers, creating the Rattenfanger, a versatile working ratter and watchdog. The Rattenfanger became the Pinscher, and it remained a hardworking dog for several centuries, especially valued for its rodent-catching ability around the stables.
Rate:  (3.3)
Sphynx
The Sphynx is not the first instance of hairlessness in domestic cats. This natural, spontaneous mutation has been seen in various locations around the world for at least the last ninety-something years, and probably longer. The Book of the Cat (Simpson, 1903), mentioned a pair of hairless cats belonging to a New Mexico fancier. Called the “Mexican Hairless,” these cats supposedly were obtained from Indians around Albuquerque.
Rate:  (3.6)
Himalayan
The first deliberate cross between a Siamese and a Persian was made in 1924 by a Swedish geneticist, but it wasn’t until 1935 that the first pointed pattern longhair was born. In the early 1930s two Harvard medical employees crossed a Siamese female with a black Persian male, not to create a new breed, but to establish how certain characteristics were inherited. This mating produced a litter of black, shorthaired kittens. They then bred a black Persian female with a Siamese male. The outcome was the same. This is not surprising, since long hair and the colorpoint pattern are both governed by r...
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Gray Wolf
The largest canid in the world, the gray wolf spends most of its life in packs, usually of five to ten individuals, that are led by the so-called alpha pair, the only male and female in the pack to breed. Occasionally the wolf hunts and forages alone. However, when preying on large animals such as moose and deer, it will hunt with the pack, using a variety of strategies, such as pushing its prey toward a rendez-vous point where other pack members wait in ambush. The wolf uses a haunting howl to keep the pack together. High-ranking adults also communicate by scent-marking with u...
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Foxes & Wolves
Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda)
Canidae (Dogs and Relatives)
The fennec fox, smallest of all canids, is well adapted to desert life: Its body is small; its hair is light-colored to reduce heat absorption; and its large ears are highly vascularized to facilitate cooling. Also, its feet have hairy soles for traction and heat protection in sand, and it can sustain long periods without drinking. These foxes dig multichambered dens in the sand and rest there during the day, shielded from the sun. At night they venture forth to hunt insects and small vertebrates. Once they locate their prey, they dig in the sand at high speed to catch it. Fenn...
Rate:  (4.7)
Location: Foxes & Wolves
Giant Panda
Reclusive herbivores, giant pandas once enjoyed a wide range in southern China. However, habitat destruction and poaching for their valuable fur have killed off most of them, leaving only about one thousand in the wild. The ancestors of the giant panda were carnivores, but its diet has evolved into one of mostly stalks and roots of the slow-growing, nutrient-poor bamboo. It spends ten to sixteen hours a day eating the twenty to forty pounds (9 to 18 kg) of bamboo it needs for its daily quota. It forages over a large area to get enough; a typical home range is about 1.5 to 2.5 squar...
Rate:  (4)
Location: Bears
Clouded Leopard / Clouded Tiger / Mint Leopard (Neofelis nebulosa)
Order: Carnivora,Family: Felidae
The clouded leopard is the largest of the small to medium cats. With an average body length of 2 to 3 feet, this cat has a long, bushy tail measuring 2 1/2 to 3 feet and relatively short legs with large, broad paws. Males weigh approximately 40 to 60 pounds; females are smaller. The clouded leopard's fur is pale yellow to rich brown. Its underside is pale or white with several spots; the neck and back are streaked with pale, elongated blotches edged with dark brown or black; the head and legs are usually spotted; and the tail is heavily furred and marked with broken black rings. It h...
Rate:  (4.5)
Location: Big Cats
Rattlesnake
Order: Squamata, Family: Viperidae
Pit viper. Characterized by a tail rattle that produces a buzzing sound when vibrated. Rattle is composed of horny, loosely connected segments added one at a time with each skin shedding, usually containing six to ten segments. Triangular-shaped head that is broader than the neck. Coloring varies by species, but usually blends in well with its surroundings, i.e., mottled or banded in shades of tan and brown, and also combinations of grayish green, orange, red, bright green, yellow, black or peach.
Rate:  (4)
Sharp-tailed Snake (Contia tenuis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
Nearctic: The Sharp-tailed Snake (Contia tenuis) is a North American species generally found in the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range from southern California to southern British Columbia and along the Pacific Coast of California. In California, this species can be found in and along the mountains from Eureka to central San Luis Obispo, and along western slope of the Sierras in the foothills and at middle to low elevations (max altitude 2130 m (7000 ft.).
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Spiny-Tailed Iguana (Ctenosaura similis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Iguanidae
The spiny-tailed iguana is found throughout Mexico, large areas in Central America and islands adjacent to Panama. Spiny-tailed iguanas are large, bulky lizards with adult males reaching up to 18 inches long with an 18-inch tail.
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Location: Lizards
West Indian Manatee
The manatee, often called the sea cow, is the only exclusively herbivorous marine mammal. It grazes on all kinds of aquatic plants, especially marine sea grasses, assisted by its large prehensile lips, which are studded with bristles. During the day, it is frequently found close to the surface, sleeping within the top three to ten feet (1 to 3 m). Occasionally it swims down to thirty feet (10 m), propelling itself along with the aid of its large flat tail, which it also uses as a rudder. When feeding, which it usually does at night, it walks along the bottom using its fore limbs. I...
Rate:  (4.6)
Location: Water Life
Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)
The biggest animal in the world
Blue whales are the biggest animals in the world, and the females are larger than the males. The longest female on record measured 110 feet (34 m); the heaviest weighed 190 tons. All three subspecies travel in pods composed of thirty to fifty individuals. These whales, as with other members of the family Balaenopteridae, filter some six to seven tons of krill at a time with their baleen plates, "gulping" water and krill, then closing the mouth and forcing the water back out through the baleen. Blue whales were too big and too fast for whalers before the 1864 invention of the exploding-he...
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Location: Whales Breeds
Gemsbok
Herds of ten to forty gemsbock are not uncommon and groups of up to a hundred have been recorded. These animals are frequently found in association with other species of gazelles and sometimes zebras, foraging for grasses and leaves. Gemsbock can go many days without water, but in the more arid parts of their range, they sometimes dig a trough in a dried-out river bed to reach the water table below and quench their thirst. The males are often found alone and may be quite aggressive. When they fight, they lower their heads and fence, their long horns pointing straight out. These "...
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Total results: 18