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Star-nosed Mole (Condylura cristata)
The Star-nosed Mole (Condylura cristata) is a small North American mole found in eastern Canada and the north-eastern United States. It is the only member of the tribe Condylurini and the genus Condylura. It lives in wet lowland areas and eats small invertebrates, aquatic insects, worms and molluscs. It is a good swimmer and can forage along the bottoms of streams and ponds. Like other moles, this animal digs shallow surface tunnels for foraging; often, these tunnels exit underwater. It is active day and night and remains active in winter, when it has been observed tunnelling through the s...
Rate:  (3.3)
Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus)
The swimming star with the giant nose
Everyone who has the opportunity to see a Proboscis monkey is struck by its giant nose. But there is a second feature which is very typical for Proboscis monkeys and their relatives, the so called Leaf-monkeys - it's their large belly. Indicated by the name of that group of apes, they almost exclusively feed on leaves - and leaves are not easy to digest. Moreover leaves are not very rich in energy-content. So Proboscis monkeys have to eat a lot of leaves and spend most of their time on feeding. In order to obtain enough energy from their meagre nourishment, Proboscis monkeys have got a com...
Rate:  (2.4)
Location: Monkeys
Labrador Retriever
The original Labradors were all-purpose water dogs originating in Newfoundland, not Labrador. Not only did the breed not originate in Labrador, but it also was not originally called the Labrador retriever. The Newfoundland of the early 1800s came in different sizes, one of which was the "Lesser" or "St. John's" Newfoundland the earliest incarnation of the Labrador. These dogs medium-sized black dogs with close hair not only retrieved game but also retrieved fish, pulled small fishing boats through icy water and helped the fisherman in any task involving swimming. Eventually the breed...
Rate:  (4.2)
Lions in the Water
If not for the efforts of ecologist Christiaan Winterbach and his wife, Hanlie, the swimming lions of the Okavango Delta still would be shrouded in mystery. The husband-and-wife team run a monitoring project that seeks to understand how lions are managing to live in this land of seasonal flooding. We caught up with ecologist Christiaan Winterbach to ask him a few questions about the project and to find out how the swimming lions have been doing since filming.
Rate:  (3)
Location: Big Cats
Striped Dolphin
Identified by the lateral stripes that originate at their eyes, the striped dolphins are sometimes seen swimming alongside large ships off California and in the Atlantic, a behavior known as bow-riding. In the eastern tropical Pacific, where they are also found, they tend to be shyer. These dolphins are energetic swimmers, sometimes moving upside down and jumping as high as twenty feet (6 m) out of the water to do backward somersaults. Social animals, they are commonly found in schools of up to five hundred individuals. The size of the school depends on geographic location; tho...
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Location: Water Life
Great Hammerhead shark (Sphyrna mokarran)
Order: Carcharhiniformes, Family: Sphyrnidae
Hammerheads are best known for their distinctive mallet-shaped heads and widely spaced eyes, which they swing back and forth while swimming to detect prey. They are the only species of shark known to travel in schools.
Rate:  (3.7)
Location: Sharks & Rays
Harp Seal
Harp seals migrate in large groups as much as five thousand miles (8,000 km) from feeding grounds in the north to breeding grounds in the south. They spend about half the year in the north, feeding on fish and invertebrates. In the spring, thousands of females congregate on pack ice to give birth and nurse their white-furred pups. Following weaning, the pups shed their white fur, which is replaced by silver-gray pelage with dark spots. After successive molts, the spots are replaced by the typical harp-shaped marking on the back. By June the harp seals are moving northward again...
Rate:  (2.6)
Location: Water Life


Total results: 7