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Search results for "snake"



Snakes - Venomous
A venomous snake (poisonous) is a snake that uses modified saliva, venom, delive...
Snakes - Non-Venomous


The Ten Most Deadliest Snakes - Steve Irwin
Steve Irwin
Join Steve Irwin as he treks through Australia on a mission to find the world's ten most venomous snakes and to educate us on how we can peacefully cohabit with them
Rate:  (3.2)
Bunny vs Snake
Rate:  (4.2)
Cobra Bite
Austin Stevens being bitten by a cobra
Rate:  (3.8)
Location: Movies / Videos
Dealing with non-venomous snake bites
To start out with, I feel that most cases of snakebite are NOT the snake's fault, but rather the fault of the person who is working with or around the snake. People can easily avoid snakebites by using some common sense. Over the years, several snakes have bitten me. I have suffered bites from various rat snakes, kingsnakes, racers, gophers, water, garters, ribbons, Burmese pythons, ball pythons, and rosy boas. I did have a female western hognose snake that seemed to have a strange fascination with wanting to chew on my fingers; however, I have never allowed her the opportunity to latch...
Rate:  (4.1)
Boomslang (Dispholidus typus)
By: C.M.Shorter
The Boomslang Snake is a rather large, highly poisonous tree dwelling snake found throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Boomslangs are greenish to brown or even black in color. These coloring variations are the greatest of any other snakes in their Afrotropic regional habitat. It is the adult females that are usually brown in color, with males a light green color often with black or blue highlights outlining the edges of their scales. This snake is a one deadly animal because of its preference for aerial positioning in tree top and shrub cover. Hard to see in the thick forested cover of the savanna, ...
Rate:  (3.4)
Treating and Preventing Venomous Snakes Bites
By John Henkel
They fascinate. They repel. Some pose a danger. Most are harmless. And whether they are seen as slimy creatures or colorful curiosities, snakes play important environmental roles in the fragile ecosystems of the nation's wildlife areas. People who frequent these wilderness spots, as well as those who camp, hike, picnic, or live in snake-inhabited areas, should be aware of potential dangers posed by venomous snakes. A bite from one of these, in which the snake may inject varying degrees of toxic venom, should always be considered a medical emergency, says the American Red Cross.
Rate:  (3.5)
Louisiana Milk Snake (Lampropeltis triangulum amaura)
The Louisiana milk snake is one of four coral snake-pretenders in Texas. Although non-venomous, Louisiana milk snakes look like highly venomous coral snakes-they both have bands of black, red, and yellow. They grow to a length of 16 to 24 inches (40 to 69 cm). Louisiana milk snakes have alternating bands, in order, of black-red-black-yellow-black. The red bands are solidly colored and are wider than the yellow or black bands. Its black head is slightly pointed, and its scales are shiny.
Rate:  (4)
Vine Snake (Oxybelis fulgidus)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
The slender vine snake measures 5 to 6 1/2 inches in length and 1 to 2 inches in diameter. Its head is the same width as its body. It has sharp rear fangs. The vine snake is green-brown in color.
Rate:  (3.3)
Rattlesnake
Order: Squamata, Family: Viperidae
Pit viper. Characterized by a tail rattle that produces a buzzing sound when vibrated. Rattle is composed of horny, loosely connected segments added one at a time with each skin shedding, usually containing six to ten segments. Triangular-shaped head that is broader than the neck. Coloring varies by species, but usually blends in well with its surroundings, i.e., mottled or banded in shades of tan and brown, and also combinations of grayish green, orange, red, bright green, yellow, black or peach.
Rate:  (3.2)
Krait (Bungarus caeruleus - common, Bungarus fasciatus - banded)
The krait is a highly venomous snake found in Southeast Asia. There are 13 species of krait, and two prominent types of krait in India. All kraits are nocturnal. The banded krait is readily identified by its alternate black and yellow bands. Kraits also have a row of hexagonal scales along the ridge of their back. The common krait is a slate-colored snake with thin white bands that are absent in the anterior part of its body. Since their fangs are not very long, kraits inject their venom by chewing. The poison affects mainly the nervous system. The common krait can reach a maximu...
Rate:  (3.8)
Coral Cobra Snake (Aspidelaps Lubricus)
The coral snake's body is orange to coral-red, with 20 to 47 black bands that decrease in width toward the tail. Its belly is yellow, with the black bands completely encircling the body in young snakes, but fading in adults, leaving only the first two or three intact. The coral snake has a broad rostral shield that it uses to burrow. Its head is indistinct from its neck.
Rate:  (3.3)
Speckled Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getulus holbrooki)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
Hatchling is 7-9 inches in length; adult grows to between 35-48 inches in length. Shiny black or dark brown with small spots ranging from yellow-orange to creamy white or ivory white, and sometimes spots blend together creating a banded appearance; yellow belly with occasional black sections; 2-4 yellow lines on edges of head; juvenile tends to be dark olive-green. Large eyes at the sides of the head and nostrils at the sides of the snout, with a muscular body and neck. Nonvenomous.
Rate:  (3)
Sharp-tailed Snake (Contia tenuis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
Nearctic: The Sharp-tailed Snake (Contia tenuis) is a North American species generally found in the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range from southern California to southern British Columbia and along the Pacific Coast of California. In California, this species can be found in and along the mountains from Eureka to central San Luis Obispo, and along western slope of the Sierras in the foothills and at middle to low elevations (max altitude 2130 m (7000 ft.).
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Rat Snake (Elaphe obsoleta)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
The rat snake varies in color from almost solid black to brown, green or yellow and may have stripes or blotches. The snake's coloration tends to reflect its environment. Rat snakes grow to about 3 to 8 feet in length. They have round pupils.
Rate:  (3.5)
Rainbow Snake (Farancia erythrogramma)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
Nearctic: Because Farancia erythrogramma needs a hot, moist environment, it lives in the South Eastern United States. It can be found most often in South Carolina and Florida. Other states where F. erythrogramma can be found include Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Virginia.
Rate:  (4.1)
Pipe Snake (Anilius scytale)
Order: Squamata, Family: Aniliidae
Neotropical: The geographic range of this snake is South America. The pipe snake is approximately 75 cm in length. This species has red and black rings around it and a bright red underside. The red is displayed as a warning when provoked. The snake has an external claw on each side of the anal opening. Hind limbs and a pelvic girdle are present as well. Vestigial eyes lie beneath a large head shield. Anilius scytale is characterized by its solid, dense skull bones, useful when burrowing. The left lung is reduced giving more room to internal organs. There is no cranial kinesis. This species is...
Rate:  (3.6)
Arizona Mountain Kingsnake (Lampropeltis pyromelana pyromelana)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
Arizona mountain kingsnake hatchlings measure 8 to 13 inches in length; adults grow to 18 to 44 inches long. A colorful reptile, the kingsnake is banded with thin black bands between thicker red and white ones. Its snout is white or yellow, and its head is usually black on top, sometimes with flashes of red over the eyes. The kingsnake's large eyes sit on the sides of its head, and its nostrils are placed astride its snout.
Rate:  (4.2)
Western Hognose Snake (Heterodon nasicus)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
Grows to approximately 16-25 inches in length. Heavy-bodied, broad neck, spade-like upturned snout and enlarged teeth toward rear of upper jaw. Base color IS pale brown, buff, or gray; large dark brown spots on back, smaller spots on sides; and "washed" black belly.
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Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
This is a common and abundant species throughout North America. It is the most common of the many species of garter snakes. It is the only snake species in Alaska, and ranges further north there and in Canada than any other North American reptile. In the east it occurs all the way south to Florida and Texas, but is absent from the arid southwest.
Rate:  (4.1)
Brown Water Snake (Nerodia taxispilota)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
Nearctic: Brown water snakes are found in southeastern North America, along the Coastal Plain from Virginia south through the lowlands of the Carolinas, most of Georgia, all of Florida and southern Alabama.
Rate:  (3.3)

     

Total results: 23