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Search results for "rat"



Snakes - Non-Venomous


Emperor Tamarin (Saguinus imperator)
The Emperor Tamarin (Saguinus imperator) is a tamarin allegedly named for its similarity with the German emperor Wilhelm II. The name was first intended as a joke, but has become the official scientific name. This tamarin lives in the southwest Amazon Basin, in east Peru, north Bolivia and in the west Brazilian states of Acre and Amazonas. The fur of the Emperor Tamarin is predominantly grey colored, with yellowish speckles on its chest. The hands and feet are black and the tail is brown. Outstanding is its long, white mustache, which extends to both sides beyond the shoulders. The animal ...
Rate:  (3.9)
Spiders - Survival strategies
Spiders use many strategies to protect themselves from their enemies. One of the most amazing of these is called autotomy. This is the spider's ability to self-amputate a leg that has been grabbed by a bird or other predator. Usually the leg breaks off close to the body, at the coxa-trochanter joint. Even more amazingly, juvenile spiders can regenerate their legs - a tiny, segmented leg grows within the coxal stump and appears at the next moult. Other strategies include behavioural ploys, like direct threat displays of warning colours on the spider's body, or escaping a predator by...
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Dealing with non-venomous snake bites
To start out with, I feel that most cases of snakebite are NOT the snake's fault, but rather the fault of the person who is working with or around the snake. People can easily avoid snakebites by using some common sense. Over the years, several snakes have bitten me. I have suffered bites from various rat snakes, kingsnakes, racers, gophers, water, garters, ribbons, Burmese pythons, ball pythons, and rosy boas. I did have a female western hognose snake that seemed to have a strange fascination with wanting to chew on my fingers; however, I have never allowed her the opportunity to latch...
Rate:  (4.1)
Minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata)
Order: Cetacea, Family: Balaenopteridae
Smallest of the baleen whales in the Gulf of Mexico, adult minkes only reach up to 10.2 m in length and 10 metric tons in weight. As with all baleen whales, females are slightly larger than males of comparable age. Minke whales have a very narrow and pointed rostrum and a broad white band on the dorsal surface of the flippers. Coloration is dark gray to black above and white below. The baleen plates are yellowish-white, or cream, colored. The dorsal fin, located in the latter third of the back, is tall and falcate and the throat grooves end just beyond the flippers.
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Whales Breeds
Tuataras (Sphenodon punctatus)
The two recognized species of tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus and Sphenodon guntheri) are found on approximately 30 small, relatively inaccesible, islands off the coast of New Zealand. The species was once widely distributed throughout New Zealand, but became extinct on the mainland before the arrival of European settlers
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Lizards
German Pinscher
The progenitor of better-known Pinscher breeds, the German Pinscher is an old breed that can trace back its lineage to the German Bibarhund of the seventh century and the Tanner of the 14th century. In the 1600s, dogs with this ancestry or type were mixed with Black and Tan Terriers, creating the Rattenfanger, a versatile working ratter and watchdog. The Rattenfanger became the Pinscher, and it remained a hardworking dog for several centuries, especially valued for its rodent-catching ability around the stables.
Rate:  (3.3)
Korat
The Cat-Book Poems, a manuscript of verses and paintings written some time between 1350 and 1767 A.D. in Thailand, includes the earliest illustrations and descriptions of the Korat. The artists and writers of the document, whose names have long been forgotten, describe the Korat as a good luck cat, with eyes the color of new rice that shine like dewdrops on a lotus leaf, and a body the color of rain clouds and silver.
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Staffordshire Bull Terrier
In the early 1800s, the sport of rat killing had become quite popular among the working classes. Bull-baiting, which had been popular in earlier times, did not lend itself to the cities, and fanciers of the rat pit became increasingly enamored of dog fighting as a more exciting alternative to rat killing. In their efforts to produce a fearless, quick, strong contender for the dog pit, they crossed the bulldog of the time with the black and tan terrier, thus producing the "bull and terrier." Selective breeding resulted in a small nimble dog with incredibly strong jaws.
Rate:  (4.4)
Tufted Puffin (Fratercula cirrhata)
Family: Alcidae
The puffin's most striking feature is its large, brightly colored bill. Early sailors dubbed the puffin the "sea parrot" because of its stout body, short wings, and orange or red webbed feet, which are placed far back on its body. Males and females have the exact same markings. It's unknown whether this confuses the birds, but it certainly confuses bird-watchers. During the summer, puffins have a black back and neck with white on the sides of their head and on their breast. The puffin's white breast is so distinctive that one Inuit language refers to the puffin as katukh-p...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Elf Owl (Micrathene whitneyi)
Order: Strigiformes, Family: Strigidae
The elf owl is the smallest owl in North America. It is the size of a sparrow, with a rounded head and body. It has a short tail, sturdy unfeathered legs and big yellow eyes. With a wingspan of 9 inches, the elf owl measures 5 to 6 inches tall and weighs 1 to 1.4 ounces. It has pale, grayish-brown plumage with a row of white spots and white and buff barring on its flight feathers. Its face has no marks except for thin, pale eyebrow lines.
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Location: Birds & Bats
Rattlesnake
Order: Squamata, Family: Viperidae
Pit viper. Characterized by a tail rattle that produces a buzzing sound when vibrated. Rattle is composed of horny, loosely connected segments added one at a time with each skin shedding, usually containing six to ten segments. Triangular-shaped head that is broader than the neck. Coloring varies by species, but usually blends in well with its surroundings, i.e., mottled or banded in shades of tan and brown, and also combinations of grayish green, orange, red, bright green, yellow, black or peach.
Rate:  (4)
Rat Snake (Elaphe obsoleta)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
The rat snake varies in color from almost solid black to brown, green or yellow and may have stripes or blotches. The snake's coloration tends to reflect its environment. Rat snakes grow to about 3 to 8 feet in length. They have round pupils.
Rate:  (3.5)
Goldfish (Carassius auratus)
Order: Cypriniformes, Family: Cyprinidae
Although goldfishes originated in China, they have now spread worldwide in aquariums, ornamental pools, and into the wild. In the wild, goldfish can be found in slow-moving, freshwater bodies of water. As with their close relative the carp, they thrive in slightly murky water. In captivity, an aquarium with live plants and a dirt bottom is ideal. Bi-weekly water changes are a good idea as a goldfish tank is hard to keep clean. Live plants must be replaced fairly regularly; goldfish enjoy eating them. Small pebbles are a suitable substitute for the pond-like bottom. Typically, goldfish will s...
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Location: Water Life


Total results: 13