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Wapiti / Elk (Cervus elaphus)
Order: Artiodactyla, Family: Cervidae
Large, deerlike, the males with large, usually six-pointed antlers that are shed annually; hair on neck long and shaggy; upperparts buffy fawn, the head, neck, legs and belly dull rusty brown to blackish; large rump patch creamy buff to whitish; metatarsal gland oval, about 75 mm long, the center white; tail a mere rudiment. Dental formula: I 0/3, C 1/1, Pm 3/3, M 3/3 X 2 = 34. External measurements average: (males) total length, about 2 m; tail, 160 mm; hind foot, 670 mm. Weight, up to 300 kg, averaging about 275 kg. Females are smaller and usually without antlers.
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Gotland
Skogsruss, Russ, Gotlandsruss, Skogsbaggar, Skogshäst
The herd of ponies at Lojsta moor on the island of Gotland is unique. The Gotland pony, or Russ, as it is called in Sweden, has been called a living relic of the past, and that is precisely what it is. Thanks to decisive intervention on the part of the local inhabitants, Sweden's most primordial horses still live as they have for thousands of years on the wooded moors of Gotland. The Gotland Pony horses have lived in the forest regions of the island of Gotland from time immemorial. Their history is mysterious and fascinating. Discoveries from the Stone Age show that horses have been pr...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
Exmoor Pony
The Exmoor pony is the oldest and purist of the British native pony breeds. The ponies have roamed the bleak, open moors of southwestern England, known as Exmoor, for centuries. They are believed to be the direct descendants of the horses that walked onto Britain before it was an island. Archaeological evidence dating back over 60,000 years bears an uncanny similarity to the Exmoor Pony of today. Natural selection has designed a pony suited to survival in a cold and wet climate without the provision of food or shelter by mankind. Two features unique to the breed are the “hooded-eye”, or he...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
Bull Terrier
Bull-baiting and dog fighting were long considered great entertainment by many Europeans, and patrons were constantly trying crosses to achieve the ultimate fighting dog. Around 1835, a cross between a bulldog and the old English terrier produced a particularly adept pit dog known as the "bull and terrier." A later cross to the Spanish pointer added needed size, and the result was a tenacious, strong, yet agile dog that came to dominate the pits. As interest in the exhibition of dogs grew in England, little attention was paid to these dogs so long associated with the lower echelons of society.
Rate:  (4.3)
Amstaff - American Staffordshire Terrier
The American Staffordshire terrier and the Staffordshire bull terrier descended from the same lines. The prototype originally sprang from crossing the old type of bulldog with some old terrier types, probably the English sooth terrier. The result was aptly called the "bull and terrier," later to be dubbed the Staffordshire bull terrier. The dogs gained fame among fanciers of dog fighting, a popular sport despite its having been declared illegal. Their fighting ability gained them passage to America in the late 1800s, where they dominated the fighting "pits." Here they became known as the pit b...
Rate:  (3.8)
Keeshond
The keeshond (plural: keeshonden) is one of the family of spitz dogs, although its exact origin is undocumented. It seems to have been well-established in Holland at least since the 18th century as a companion and watchdog. The breed later became known as the barge dog because it was often kept as a watchdog on the small vessels navigating the Rhine River. By a stroke of fate, the breed became entangled in the political events of Holland in the years preceding the French Revolution. The leader of the patriot faction was a man named Kees de Gyselaer, who in turn owned a barge dog named Kees.
Rate:  (4.4)
Akita
Akita Inu, Japanese Akita
The Akita is perhaps the most renowned and venerated of the native Japanese breeds. Although it bears a likeness to dogs from ancient Japanese tombs, the modern Akita traces back to the 17th century, when a nobleman with a keen interest in dogs was exiled to the Akita Prefecture of the island of Honshu, a rugged area with intensely cold winters. He challenged the landowners there to compete in breeding a race of powerful hunting dogs. These dogs distinguished themselves in the hunting of bear, deer and wild boar, holding the game at bay for the hunter.
Rate:  (4.4)
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
In the early 1800s, the sport of rat killing had become quite popular among the working classes. Bull-baiting, which had been popular in earlier times, did not lend itself to the cities, and fanciers of the rat pit became increasingly enamored of dog fighting as a more exciting alternative to rat killing. In their efforts to produce a fearless, quick, strong contender for the dog pit, they crossed the bulldog of the time with the black and tan terrier, thus producing the "bull and terrier." Selective breeding resulted in a small nimble dog with incredibly strong jaws.
Rate:  (4.4)
Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis)
Order: Falconiformes, Family: Accipitridae
Snail Kites can be found in both South and Central America. Some are also found in Mexico and Cuba. The United States also has a small population concentrated in Florida. Mass: 340 to 567 g. Snail kites are medium-sized hawks, weighing from 12-20 oz. They are about 14-16 inches long and have a wingspan of 43-36 inches. The females are very slightly smaller than the male.
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Birds & Bats
Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)
Order: Falconiformes, Family: Accipitridae
The golden eagle is about 30 to 40 inches in length and weighs between 9 and 13 pounds. Its wingspan can be as wide as 7.5 feet, which makes the golden eagle the largest predatory bird in North America. The tail of the golden eagle is grayish brown, while the head, body and other feathers on the wings are typically black in color. The feathers at the head and nape of the eagle's neck are golden brown. Adult eagles have dark brown eyes, while their bill and claws are black. Their cere (a waxy, fleshy area at the base of the beak) and feet are yellow, and their legs are feathered...
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Birds & Bats
Common Black Hawk (Buteogallus anthracinus)
Order: Falconiformes, Family: Accipitridae
The common black-hawk is found in the southwestern United States, throughout Mexico, Central America, and northern South America to Guyana. They can also be found in Cuba and The Isle of Pines. Mass: 630 to 1,300 kg. The common black-hawk averages 53 cm in length (21 inches) and has a wingspan of 127 cm (50 inches.) Like most other raptor species, common black-hawks are sexually dimorphic, with the females being larger than the males.
Rate:  (4)
Location: Birds & Bats
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)
Order: Falconiformes, Family: Accipitridae
The bald eagle is the U.S. national bird; it is the only eagle unique to North America. Spanish name: Aguila Cabeza Blanca, Aguila French name: Pygargue à Tête Blanche Other names: American eagle, white-headed eagle, white-headed sea-eagle Adult bald eagles have brown plumage with a white head and tail. Immature eagles are irregularly mottled with white until the fourth year. Their legs are feathered halfway down the tarsus, and their beak, feet and eyes are bright yellow. Bald eagles have massive tarsi, short and powerful grasping toes, and long talons. The talon of t...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Green Tree Pit Viper / Common Bamboo Viper (Trimeresurus gramineus)
The green tree pit viper is uniform bright or dull green with light yellow on its lips. It grows to 18 to 30 inches in length. The green tree pit viper's range includes India, Myanmar, Malaya, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, China, Indonesia and Formosa.
Rate:  (3.1)


Total results: 13