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Whales Breeds
Whales are large, magnificent, intelligent, aquatic mammals. They breathe air th...


Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)
Koalas vary in size and colour depending on where Australia they live in Australia. Koalas found in the southern distributions (Southern NSW and Victoria) tend to be slightly larger and darker than those in the northern areas (Northern NSW and QLD). This is likely to be related to the different temperatures and is a feature exhibited by many species whose distribution encompasses large climatic variations. The most notable physical aspect of the Koala would have to be its big fluffy ears. Koalas have a great sense of hearing and an even better sense of smell. This is how they select which l...
Rate:  (3.6)
Cheviot Sheep
A Minority Breed of British Origin
Cheviot sheep are a very old breed that originated in the Cheviot Hills on the border between England and Scotland. Originally called ‘Long sheep’ (a name used since at least 1470) or ‘White sheep’ (in contrast to the Scottish Blackface), Cheviots were a mountain breed of extreme hardiness, which would produce meat and wool on cold, wet, hilly country. It was these characteristics that led Sir John Sinclair to select the breed to be taken to the North of Scotland in the late 1700s to replace the original sheep of the area. It was there that Sir John who bestowed on them the name Cheviot. Th...
Rate:  (2.9)
Location: Sheeps
African Spurred Tortoise (Geochelone sulcata)
The African Spurred Tortoise (Geochelone sulcata) is a species of tortoise which inhabits the southern edge of the Sahara desert, in northern Africa. Their diet provides them with water, and they coat their skin with mud when available to cool off. When mud wallows are not available, they retreat to cooler burrows. Spurred tortoises are important to deserts because their burrows provide shelter for other animals. They do not hibernate, like many other types of tortoises, due to their natural environment being so close to the equator. They love to dig, and make very long burrows, often much dam...
Rate:  (4.1)
Location: Turtles
Northern Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis)
Order: Cetacea, Family: Balaenidae
A large, blackish whale with the following features: no dorsal fin; head huge, about one-fourth of total length; baleen (whalebone) about 2 m long, 30 cm wide, and between 200 and 250 in number on each side of mouth; closure of mouth highly arched; no furrows on the throat; prominent, large, wartlike areas (called bonnets), the one near tip of snout largest. Total length of adults, 14-17 m; weight, 20-30 metric tons.
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Whales Breeds
West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus Linnaeus)
Order: Sirenia, Family: Trichechidae
A large, grayish, nearly hairless, aquatic mammal without hind limbs; tail broadened into a horizontal, rounded paddle; front limbs paddlelike. Dental formula: I 2/2 (nonfunctional), C 0/0, Pm 0/0, M 6/6 (variable and continuously being replaced) X 2 = 32. Total length of adults, up to 3.5 m; weight, up to 1,000 kg. Distribution in Texas: West Indian manatees are found in rivers, estuaries, and coastal areas of the tropical and subtropical New World from the southeastern United States coast along Central America and the West Indies to the northern coastline of South America. Manatees are ex...
Rate:  (3)
Location: Water Life
Yakut
The Yakut was developed in Yakutia by unconscious and natural selection in the harsh conditions of northern and central Siberia, Russia. Compared to horses of similar type and Mongolian origin, the Yakut is larger and more massive. Three Yakut types have been formed: the Northern original Yakut (the Middle Kolyma or Verkhoyansk horse); the smaller southern type which was not crossed with improved breeds; and the larger southern type tending towards the breeds used for the improvement of the local Yakut. The last type is widespread in the regions of central Yakutia, including Yakutsk, Namts...
Rate:  (3.9)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Shetland Pony
Perhaps the oldest breed of horse in Britain is the Shetland Pony. Named after the islands where it originated, it is now one of the most popular ponies in the world. The little Shetland is probably so shaggy because it was conditioned by its environment. The Shetland Islands, lying off the northern coast of Scotland, are mostly barren and have a harsh climate. For many centuries the Shetland Pony lived in the open, protected from the elements only by this thick hair, long mane, and forelocks. The Shetland Islanders domesticated the ponies to do useful work for them. The pony carried peat down...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
Norwegian Fjord
Also Known By: Fjord, Norges Fjordhest (Norwegian), Fjording, Nordbag, Nordfjord, Northern Dun, Norwegian Dun, Norwegian Pony, Vestland, West Norway, West Norwegian
The Norwegian Fjord (pronounced Fee-ord) Horse is Norway's oldest horse breed. It is estimated that the original Fjords migrated to Norway and the Scandinavian peninsula over 4,000 years ago and they were domesticated about 2,000 B.C. They have been selectively bred in Norway for over 2,000 years and the first directed selection program began in the mid-1880's. The original Norwegian Fjord varied in color and averaged 12.1 hands in size. Selection has increased the height to 13 to 14.1 hands and the breed is one of the few modern breeds exhibiting only the primitive or dun coloration.
Rate:  (4)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Nordland
Also Known By: Northland Pony, Lyngen, Lyngshest (Norway)
There is a variety of ideas as to the origin of this breed. Research indicates that it came into Norway from the east during very early times. For various reasons it was forced northward where it lived and developed through the centuries, but after World War II the breed was at the door of extinction. It is of the northern type and is similar to the Lofoten.
Rate:  (4)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Friesian
The Friesian breed is one of the oldest domesticated breeds in Europe. It is native to the province of Friesland in the northern Netherlands. The Friesian suffered a decline in numbers with the increase of mechanization on the farm and in transportation. In fact, the number of Friesian stallions reputedly was reduced to only three prior to World War I. The breed was rejuvenated by introducing Oldenburg blood. In recent years the breed has attracted a great deal of acclaim and its future seems assured. The Friesian is used for light agricultural work. It is traditionally used in harness to quai...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
Estonian Native
Mestnaya estonskaya, Estonskaya loshad, Estonian Klepper, Estonian Pony
The Estonian Native is one of the few breeds which has retained the characteristic features of the native northern horse and were not significantly influenced by crossing with other breeds. It played an important role in the formation of the Obva (now extinct) and Vyatka breeds. The breed has also been used with the Hackney in the formation of the Tori breed and with Ardennes in forming the Estonian Draft. The Estonian first penetrated Russia via Novgorod as early as the 14th and 15th centuries due to its good working qualities and high adaptability. As agriculture developed and demand for ...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
Dales Pony
Native to the upper dales of Northern Yorkshire, England, is the Dales Pony. The ancestors of the Dales pony include to a large degree the Pennine Pony, with infusions of several other breeds including the Galloway, Norfolk Trotter and Wilson Pony blood. Dales ponies were bred specifically for the Pennine lead industry as pack ponies, and they soon became famous for their ability to quickly navigate rough country under heavy weights. With the advent of railways and better roads, the ponies found a niche on the small farms of the inhospitable upper dales; the strength and surefootedness of the ...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
Byelorussian Harness Horse
The Byelorussian Harness breed was formed on the basis of the native northern forest type horses improved by the Dole (from Norway), Ardennes and Brabancon breeds. The Dole influence was the strongest. Long-term inter se breeding of various generations of crosses created a breed most suitable for the current requirements of Byelorussian agriculture. The horse has adapted well to work in wooded areas with swampy and sandy soils. It can also be used for milk and meat production.
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Russian Blue
The most commonly held theory regarding this breed’s origin is that Russian Blues were brought to Great Britain in 1860 by British sailors from the White Sea port town of Archangel (Arkhangelsk) in northern Russia. Whether this story is true—and if true, whether the cats really originated in that area—is anyone’s guess. Their thick coats give credence to the theory that they developed in a cold climate, and, according to accounts, blue shorthairs still exist in Russia.
Rate:  (3.2)
Norwegian Forest Cat
The Norwegian Forest Cat, called the skogkatt (forest cat) in Norway, is a natural breed and despite its feral appearance is not a descendant or a hybrid of any wild cat species. Forest Cats probably arrived in Norway from Europe, descendants of domestic cats introduced to northern Europe by the Romans. It is supposed that the Norwegian Forest Cat has existed for a long time, since several mentions of large, longhaired cats exist in Norse mythology.
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Brown Bear (Ursus arctos)
Order: Carnivora, Family: Ursida
Technically, brown and grizzly bears are classified as the same species. Brown bear refers to the members of the species found in coastal areas; brown bears found inland and in northern habitats are called grizzlies. The brown bear can weigh between 200 and 1,700 pounds. Brown bears are the largest of all carnivores. They measure 5 to 9 feet in length from head to rump, and their tails are 2 to 5 inches long. With a shoulder height of 3 to 5 feet, they can tower an intimidating 8 feet when standing upright on their hind legs. On average, adult males are larger than females. The brown...
Rate:  (3.3)
Location: Bears
Gray Jay (Perisoreus canadensis)
Order: Passeriformes, Family: Corvidae
Nearctic: Breeding range: The Gray Jay is found from tree line in northern Canada and Alaska south through boreal and subalpine forests to northern California on the west coast, Arizona and New Mexico in the Rocky Mountains, northern Wisconsin in the midwest, and New York in the east. Winter range: The non-breeding range is essentially the same as the breeding range, as the Gray Jay does not migrate except for (in late fall and winter) occasional altitudinal movements in the Rockies and rare latitudinal movements elsewhere, probably due to food shortages. Perisoreus canadensis has never be...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Common Raven (Corvus corax)
Order: Passeriformes, Family: Corvidae
The raven is a large, black bird (the largest of all entirely black birds) with a wedge-shaped tail. It calls frequently, and has a peculiar hoarse, resonant croak. The sexes are very similar physically, although the female is smaller. The raven's range is widespread to say the least. It encompasses northwest Europe, Britain, Holarctic, Greenland (mainly coastal areas), Iceland, northern Scandinavia, east to Pacific, central Asia to the Himalayas and northwest India, Iran and the Near East, northwest Africa and Canary Islands, North and Central America.
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Location: Birds & Bats
Common Black Hawk (Buteogallus anthracinus)
Order: Falconiformes, Family: Accipitridae
The common black-hawk is found in the southwestern United States, throughout Mexico, Central America, and northern South America to Guyana. They can also be found in Cuba and The Isle of Pines. Mass: 630 to 1,300 kg. The common black-hawk averages 53 cm in length (21 inches) and has a wingspan of 127 cm (50 inches.) Like most other raptor species, common black-hawks are sexually dimorphic, with the females being larger than the males.
Rate:  (3.5)
Location: Birds & Bats
Leopard (Panthera pardus)
Order: Carnivora, Family: Felidae
The leopard could at one time be found from the British Isles to Japan and throughout most of Asia. Today they can still be found in Africa, except for the true deserts of Sahara and Kalahari, and some parts of Asia such as Sri Lanka. Leopards are more common in eastern and central Africa. Conversely, they are rare in western and northern Africa and most of Asia.
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Big Cats

     

Total results: 30