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Sharks & Rays
Sharks can find prey by following the electrical impulses that animals emit, and...
Horses & Ponies
Horses belong to the equus family. Equus comes from the ancient Greek word meani...
Amphibians
Amphibians lay their eggs in water, and young amphibians tend to resemble small ...
Snakes - Venomous
A venomous snake (poisonous) is a snake that uses modified saliva, venom, delive...


Pug
A Pug is a toy dog breed with a wrinkly face and medium-small body. Pug puppies are often called puglets. The word "pug" may have come from the Old English pugg, which was an affectionate term for a playful little devil or monkey. The breed is often summarized as multum in parvo ("much in little"), describing the Pug's great personality and small size. While most Pugs appearing in eighteenth century prints tended to be long and lean, the current breed standards call for a square, cobby body, a compact form, deep chest, and well-developed muscle. Their heads, carried on arched necks, ...
Rate:  (3.3)
Axolotl
The Axolotl (or ajolote) (Ambystoma mexicanum) is the best-known of the Mexican neotenic mole salamanders belonging to the Tiger Salamander complex. Larvae of this species fail to undergo metamorphosis, so the adults remain aquatic and gilled. The species originates from the lake underlying Mexico City. Axolotls are used extensively in scientific research due to their ability to regenerate most body parts, ease of breeding, and large embryos. They are commonly kept as pets in the United States, Great Britain, Australia, Japan (where they are sold under the name Wooper Rooper, and other countri...
Rate:  (3.3)
Hagfish
Hagfish are marine craniates of the class Myxini, also known as Hyperotreti. Despite their name, there is some debate about whether they are strictly fish (as there is for lampreys), since they belong to a much more primitive lineage than any other group that is commonly defined fish (Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes). Their unusual feeding habits and slime-producing capabilities have led members of the scientific and popular media to dub the hagfish as the most "disgusting" of all sea creatures.
Rate:  (4)
Location: Water Life
Sloth
Sloths are medium-sized mammals that live in Central and South America belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Pilosa. Most scientists call these two families the Folivora suborder, while some call it Phyllophaga. Sloths are omnivores. They may eat insects, small lizards and carrion, but their diet consists mostly of buds, tender shoots, and leaves. Sloths have made extraordinary adaptations to an arboreal browsing lifestyle. Leaves, their main food source, provide very little energy or nutrition and do not digest easily: sloths have very large, spe...
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Monkeys
Two-headed turtle found in Cuba
A policeman has made an unusual discovery near a river in Cuba - a turtle with two heads. The tiny turtle is thought to be around a week old and was found near one of the country's most contaminated rivers. Had it not been noticed in a pile of leaves by Officer Alexander Napoles the turtle may have died, but now it has been taken to a local aquarium. At the moment it is healthy and being looked after, and experts are keeping a close eye on its progress. Alexis Fernandez, a biologist from the National Aquarium of Cuba, said: "It is an animal that is at a disadvantage or that...
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Turtles
Crocodile Hunter: Most Embarrassing Moments
Here is a hilarious segment from the Crocodile Hunter program showing Steve Irwin making various bloopers. I hope this can cheer up some people who are mourning Steve's death, I know it worked for me.
Rate:  (4.6)
Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)
Koalas vary in size and colour depending on where Australia they live in Australia. Koalas found in the southern distributions (Southern NSW and Victoria) tend to be slightly larger and darker than those in the northern areas (Northern NSW and QLD). This is likely to be related to the different temperatures and is a feature exhibited by many species whose distribution encompasses large climatic variations. The most notable physical aspect of the Koala would have to be its big fluffy ears. Koalas have a great sense of hearing and an even better sense of smell. This is how they select which l...
Rate:  (3.7)
The Ten Most Deadliest Snakes - Steve Irwin
Steve Irwin
Join Steve Irwin as he treks through Australia on a mission to find the world's ten most venomous snakes and to educate us on how we can peacefully cohabit with them
Rate:  (3.2)
Chimpanzee
Noisy and curious, intelligent and social, the chimpanzee is the mammal most like a human. Chimpanzees fascinate humans and are favorites both in zoos and the wild. In East Africa the chimpanzee is found in the wild in Tanzania and Uganda, but only in captivity in Kenya. Gombe National Park in Tanzania is the first park in Africa specifically created for chimpanzees. The chimpanzee has a thickset body with long arms, short legs and no tail. Much of the body is covered with long black hair, but the face, ears, fingers and toes are bare. They have hands that can grip firmly, allowing the...
Rate:  (3.9)
Location: Monkeys
Family Hexathelidae
Funnel-web spiders, the most notorious members of our spider fauna, are found only in eastern Australia. There are at least 40 species currently placed in two genera: Hadronyche and Atrax. They are medium to large spiders, varying from 1-5 cm body length. Males are more lightly built than females. Body colour can vary from black to brown but the hard carapace covering the front part of the body is always sparsely haired and glossy. The lateral pair of spinning organs (spinnerets) at the end of the abdomen are longer and easily visible in Atrax spp. but often shorter in Hadronyche spp. Not ...
Rate:  (4.3)
Spiders - Survival strategies
Spiders use many strategies to protect themselves from their enemies. One of the most amazing of these is called autotomy. This is the spider's ability to self-amputate a leg that has been grabbed by a bird or other predator. Usually the leg breaks off close to the body, at the coxa-trochanter joint. Even more amazingly, juvenile spiders can regenerate their legs - a tiny, segmented leg grows within the coxal stump and appears at the next moult. Other strategies include behavioural ploys, like direct threat displays of warning colours on the spider's body, or escaping a predator by...
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Dealing with non-venomous snake bites
To start out with, I feel that most cases of snakebite are NOT the snake's fault, but rather the fault of the person who is working with or around the snake. People can easily avoid snakebites by using some common sense. Over the years, several snakes have bitten me. I have suffered bites from various rat snakes, kingsnakes, racers, gophers, water, garters, ribbons, Burmese pythons, ball pythons, and rosy boas. I did have a female western hognose snake that seemed to have a strange fascination with wanting to chew on my fingers; however, I have never allowed her the opportunity to latch...
Rate:  (4.1)
Tamworth Pigs
A Rare Breed of British Origin
Tamworth pigs were developed in Staffordshire, England, from around the beginning of the nineteenth century. The breed is regarded as being of a rather primitive type with a long snout and rather pricked ears, and it has been described as possibly the purest representative of the native English pig. Its most distinguishing feature is its unusual golden-red colouring. (There are several theories as to the origin of that colouring – credit is given to variously to the introduction of a red boar from India, from Barbados and from Ireland.) The breed was well established by the 1870s and its fi...
Rate:  (3)
Location: Pigs
Kunekune Pigs
A Rare Breed of New Zealand Origin
The delightful Kunekune developed into its present form in New Zealand, although the breed is almost certainly of Asian origin*. During most of the period these pigs have been in New Zealand they were kept almost solely by Maori communities, and were to a large extent unknown by Europeans. (It is quite certain, however, that they were not in this country prior to the arrival of Europeans and they were probably introduced very early in the European period by whalers or traders.) A combined excursion, in 1984, by Staglands Wildlife Reserve and Willowbank Wildlife Reserve, led to 18 animals be...
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Location: Pigs
Auckland Island Pigs
A Rare Breed of New Zealand Origin
Pigs were first introduced onto Auckland Island, south of mainland New Zealand, in 1807 as a source of food for whalers and shipwrecked sailors. They thrived and were reported as “numerous” in 1840 when more pigs were released, followed by further liberations in 1842. Continuing concern for the welfare of castaways led to a final introduction of pigs in the 1890s. By the end of the nineteenth century there was a thriving feral pig population on Auckland Island derived from the successive liberations over the previous century and these animals remained isolated over the next hundred years....
Rate:  (3.1)
Location: Pigs
Long-Tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)
By Christopher Bonadio
Long tailed or crab eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are found in southeast Asia from Burma to the Philippines and southward through Indochina, Malaysia, and Indonesia. They are found as far east as the Timor Islands. Long-tailed macaques are "ecologically diverse." Some of the habitats in which they have been found are primary forests, disturbed and secondary forests, and riverine and coastal forests of nipa palm and mangrove. Long-tailed macaques live most successfully in disturbed habitats and on the periphery of forests. In Sumatra, they achieve their highest population densitie...
Rate:  (3.5)
Location: Monkeys
Puma (Profelis concolor)
America's allrounder
Many animal species are adapted to quite narrow habitats providing certain living conditions. This is not different concerning cats: Cheetahs, eg., are animals which are able to survive only in savannas and semi-deserts, while Tigers are "forest creatures", which prefer habitats with a lot of trees and much water. But on the other hand there are also species, which are real allrounders, inhabiting all kinds of habitats in many subspecies. The most prominent examples are the Leopard in Africa and Asia and its American counterpart - the Puma.
Rate:  (4.2)
Location: Big Cats
Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus)
The swimming star with the giant nose
Everyone who has the opportunity to see a Proboscis monkey is struck by its giant nose. But there is a second feature which is very typical for Proboscis monkeys and their relatives, the so called Leaf-monkeys - it's their large belly. Indicated by the name of that group of apes, they almost exclusively feed on leaves - and leaves are not easy to digest. Moreover leaves are not very rich in energy-content. So Proboscis monkeys have to eat a lot of leaves and spend most of their time on feeding. In order to obtain enough energy from their meagre nourishment, Proboscis monkeys have got a com...
Rate:  (2.4)
Location: Monkeys
Treating and Preventing Venomous Snakes Bites
By John Henkel
They fascinate. They repel. Some pose a danger. Most are harmless. And whether they are seen as slimy creatures or colorful curiosities, snakes play important environmental roles in the fragile ecosystems of the nation's wildlife areas. People who frequent these wilderness spots, as well as those who camp, hike, picnic, or live in snake-inhabited areas, should be aware of potential dangers posed by venomous snakes. A bite from one of these, in which the snake may inject varying degrees of toxic venom, should always be considered a medical emergency, says the American Red Cross.
Rate:  (3.5)
Allosaurus
A 30-foot-long, two-legged cross between a crocodile and a mountatin lion. Add a huge skull and the predatory behavior of a shark. That's Allosaurus
This was how a 1993 issue of National Geographic appropriately described this remarkable animal. Allosaurus was the most common & successful predator of the late Jurassic. These theropods are often referred to as "the wolves of the Jurassic" because they so were so widespread (A. fragilis is the only theropod species positively identified on more than one continent) and they are believed to have been pack hunters. Thousands of fossilized bones (in a few cases,nearly complete skeletons) found throughout North America has made Allosaurus one the most well understood of all predatory dinosaurs.
Rate:  (4.3)
Location: Dinosaurs

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Total results: 78