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Search results for "mammal"



Dogs - Domestic Breeds
The dog is a mammal in the order Carnivora. Dogs were first domesticated from wo...


Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)
The Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is a semi-aquatic mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. It is the sole living representative of its family (Ornithorhynchidae) and genus (Ornithorhynchus), though a number of related species have been found in the fossil record. The bizarre appearance of this egg-laying, duck-billed mammal baffled naturalists when it was first discovered, with some considering it an ela...
Rate:  (3)
Chimpanzee
Noisy and curious, intelligent and social, the chimpanzee is the mammal most like a human. Chimpanzees fascinate humans and are favorites both in zoos and the wild. In East Africa the chimpanzee is found in the wild in Tanzania and Uganda, but only in captivity in Kenya. Gombe National Park in Tanzania is the first park in Africa specifically created for chimpanzees. The chimpanzee has a thickset body with long arms, short legs and no tail. Much of the body is covered with long black hair, but the face, ears, fingers and toes are bare. They have hands that can grip firmly, allowing the...
Rate:  (3.9)
Location: Monkeys
Animal Useless Facts
Humans and dolphins are the only mammals that have sex for pleasure...
Slugs have four noses. All polar bears are left handed. In a life time, the average person eats eight spiders. The longest recorded flight of a chicken is 13 seconds. Giant squid have the largest eyes in the world. All porcupines float. The world record for sitting in a cage filled with scorpions is 21 days. Elephants are the only mammals that can't jump. Humans and dolphins are the only mammals that have sex for pleasure. Termites eat through wood 2 times faster when listening to rock music. It only takes monkeys 10 seconds to mate! An octopus's testic...
Rate:  (4.7)
Northern Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis)
Order: Cetacea, Family: Balaenidae
A large, blackish whale with the following features: no dorsal fin; head huge, about one-fourth of total length; baleen (whalebone) about 2 m long, 30 cm wide, and between 200 and 250 in number on each side of mouth; closure of mouth highly arched; no furrows on the throat; prominent, large, wartlike areas (called bonnets), the one near tip of snout largest. Total length of adults, 14-17 m; weight, 20-30 metric tons.
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Whales Breeds
Western Pipistrelle (Pipistrellus hesperus)
Order: Chiroptera, Family: Vespertilionidae
A small, drab-gray or smoke-gray bat with distinct, black, leathery facial mask and black membranes; tragus short, blunt, and slightly curved; underparts pale smoke-gray. Dental formula: I 2/3, C 1/1, Pm 2/2, M 3/3 X 2 = 34. External measurements average: (males), total length, 66 mm; tail, 27 mm; foot, 5 mm; forearm, 28 mm; (females), 73-30-5-28. Weight, 3-6 g.
Rate:  (4.2)
Location: Birds & Bats
Silver-haired Bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans)
Order: Chiroptera, Family; Vespertilionidae
A medium-sized, nearly black bat with dorsal surface of interfemoral membrane densely furred at least on the basal half and usually to near margins; upper and lowerparts sooty brown or black with white tips of hairs producing a frosted appearance; membranes and ears sooty brown or black. Dental formula: I 2/3, C 1/1, Pm 2/3, M 3/3 X 2 = 36 (upper incisors and first lower premolar very small and easily overlooked). External measurements average: total length, 100 mm; tail, 40 mm; hind foot, 8 mm; ear, 16 mm; forearm, 41 mm. Weight, 8-12 g.
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Location: Birds & Bats
Hairy-legged Vampire (Diphylla ecaudata)
Order: Chiroptera, Family: Phyllostomidae
A relatively large, sooty-brown bat with no tail; a narrow, hairy interfemoral membrane; short, rounded ears; and a short, pug-nosed snout. The dentition is highly modified with the middle upper incisors larger than the canines; the outer incisors very small and set so close to the canines that they are easily overlooked; the crowns of the outer lower incisors seven-lobed, fan-shaped, and more than twice as wide as the inner lower incisors; premolars and molars very small and probably non-functional. Dental formula: I 2/2, C 1/1, Pm 1/2, M 2/2 X 2 = 26. External measurements average: total len...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Wapiti / Elk (Cervus elaphus)
Order: Artiodactyla, Family: Cervidae
Large, deerlike, the males with large, usually six-pointed antlers that are shed annually; hair on neck long and shaggy; upperparts buffy fawn, the head, neck, legs and belly dull rusty brown to blackish; large rump patch creamy buff to whitish; metatarsal gland oval, about 75 mm long, the center white; tail a mere rudiment. Dental formula: I 0/3, C 1/1, Pm 3/3, M 3/3 X 2 = 34. External measurements average: (males) total length, about 2 m; tail, 160 mm; hind foot, 670 mm. Weight, up to 300 kg, averaging about 275 kg. Females are smaller and usually without antlers.
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Bison (Bos bison Linnaeus)
Order: Artiodactyla, Family: Bovidae
A large, cowlike mammal with distinct hump in the shoulder region; head, neck, shoulders, and forelegs with long, shaggy hair; hind part of body with short hair; head heavy with short, curved, black horns; tail short and ending in tuft of hair; color brownish black anteriorly, brownish posteriorly. Dental formula: I 0/3, C 0/1, Pm 3/3, M 3/3 X 2 = 32. External measurements approach: (males) total length, 3,400 mm; tail, 610 mm; hind foot, 610 mm; height at shoulders, 1,800 mm; females somewhat smaller. Weight of bulls, 700-1,000 kg; females, 300-400 kg.
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Barbary Sheep (Ammotragus lervia)
Order: Artiodactyla, Family: Bovidae
A relatively large sheep with horns curving outward, backward, and then inward and marked with strong transverse wrinkles; horns of females similar but somewhat smaller; tail relatively long, reaching nearly to hocks and with long hairs on terminal half; a conspicuous growth of long hair on throat, chest, and upperparts of front legs; no beard as is found in goats; upperparts and outer surface of legs uniform rufous or grayish brown; blackish mid-dorsal line from head to middle of back; flanks, inner surface of legs and belly whitish, but the chest colored like the sides; horns yellowish brown...
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Minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata)
Order: Cetacea, Family: Balaenopteridae
Smallest of the baleen whales in the Gulf of Mexico, adult minkes only reach up to 10.2 m in length and 10 metric tons in weight. As with all baleen whales, females are slightly larger than males of comparable age. Minke whales have a very narrow and pointed rostrum and a broad white band on the dorsal surface of the flippers. Coloration is dark gray to black above and white below. The baleen plates are yellowish-white, or cream, colored. The dorsal fin, located in the latter third of the back, is tall and falcate and the throat grooves end just beyond the flippers.
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Whales Breeds
West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus Linnaeus)
Order: Sirenia, Family: Trichechidae
A large, grayish, nearly hairless, aquatic mammal without hind limbs; tail broadened into a horizontal, rounded paddle; front limbs paddlelike. Dental formula: I 2/2 (nonfunctional), C 0/0, Pm 0/0, M 6/6 (variable and continuously being replaced) X 2 = 32. Total length of adults, up to 3.5 m; weight, up to 1,000 kg. Distribution in Texas: West Indian manatees are found in rivers, estuaries, and coastal areas of the tropical and subtropical New World from the southeastern United States coast along Central America and the West Indies to the northern coastline of South America. Manatees are ex...
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Water Life
Binturong (Arctictis binturong)
Order: Crocodylia, Family: Viverridae
The binturong's tail is as long as its body (2-3 feet) and is immensely strong with a small leathery patch at the end for extra grip; the binturong is the only Old World mammal with a prehensile tail. The binturong's face is lighter in color than its body; binturongs are very similar in appearance to raccoons, badgers or wolverines. The binturong weighs about 25-30 pounds (females usually weigh about 20 percent more than males), making it the second-largest member of the Viverridae family. Its coat is shaggy and fairly solid black with white tips. Females' genitals are si...
Rate:  (2.7)
Cheetah
The cheetah can reach speeds of sixty-eight miles (110 km) per hour, making it the fastest mammal in the world. It has non-retractable claws (unlike those of other cats), which provide it with better traction when it runs on soft ground. Unlike most large cats, which hunt by ambush, the cheetah chases its prey at high speed, using its tail as a stabilizer, especially when making tight turns.
Rate:  (3.7)
Location: Big Cats
West Indian Manatee
The manatee, often called the sea cow, is the only exclusively herbivorous marine mammal. It grazes on all kinds of aquatic plants, especially marine sea grasses, assisted by its large prehensile lips, which are studded with bristles. During the day, it is frequently found close to the surface, sleeping within the top three to ten feet (1 to 3 m). Occasionally it swims down to thirty feet (10 m), propelling itself along with the aid of its large flat tail, which it also uses as a rudder. When feeding, which it usually does at night, it walks along the bottom using its fore limbs. I...
Rate:  (4.6)
Location: Water Life
Northern Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis Borowski)
Order: Cetacea, Family: Balaenidae
Right whales are primarily solitary animals, although sometimes they are found in pairs. The growths, or callosities, on their head are distinctive enough to identify individuals. They move slowly through the water with their mouth partially agape, straining plankton with their baleen plates. Only about three hundred to six hundred of them still exist because of overhunting for centuries for their oil, meat, and baleen (whalebone). Their common name stems from their being the "right" whale to hunt: They were among the most valuable of whales; they swim slowly, close to shore; and...
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Location: Whales Breeds
Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)
The biggest animal in the world
Blue whales are the biggest animals in the world, and the females are larger than the males. The longest female on record measured 110 feet (34 m); the heaviest weighed 190 tons. All three subspecies travel in pods composed of thirty to fifty individuals. These whales, as with other members of the family Balaenopteridae, filter some six to seven tons of krill at a time with their baleen plates, "gulping" water and krill, then closing the mouth and forcing the water back out through the baleen. Blue whales were too big and too fast for whalers before the 1864 invention of the exploding-he...
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Location: Whales Breeds
Guanaco
Guanacos are usually found in small herds or loosely structured family groups. When a member of the herd picks up the slightest hint of danger, it makes a high-pitched warning call, causing the other guanacos to flee swiftly and nimbly across the steep and uneven terrain. Guanacos generally live at high elevations, grazing on grasses and browsing on leaves and buds. They can get by without water for long periods of time, obtaining moisture from the plants they eat. The young play and romp, but when confronted by an adult male they will lay their neck on the ground in submission. ...
Rate:  (3.7)


Total results: 18