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Goblin Shark (Mitsukurina owstoni)
The Japanese fishermen who caught the first specimen of Mitsukurina in the "Black Current" off Yokohama called it tenguzame, which means "goblin shark." This has become its common name, although very few people besides ichthyologists and shark-book authors ever get a chance to use it. The shark is extremely rare, found only in deep water off Japan, South Africa, perhaps off Portugal, and, in one strange instance, in the Indian Ocean, cable malfunction necessitated the raising of the cable, and an awl-like shark's tooth was found embedded in the wire covering. The cable had been at 750 fath...
Rate:  (4)
Location: Sharks & Rays
Polish Frizzle Chicken
Created in Holland
The Frizzle Poland was created in Holland by Mr Airie Bolan. His inspiration came from a painting by Van Gink, a famous artist. It started with the use of long legged Japanese Bantam Frizzle. It took several years to create but, between 1989 and 1991, the Frizzle Poland became recognised giving us a superb new breed. Today the popularity of the Frizzle Poland is extremely high and is now also standardised by the British Poultry Club.
Rate:  (4.3)
Location: Birds & Bats
Japanese Chin
Despite its name, the Japanese Chin is actually of ancient Chinese origin, probably sharing a close relationship with the Pekingese. Like the Pekingese, the Chin was kept by Chinese aristocracy, and sometimes presented as a gift to visiting nobility. Different stories exist about how it arrived in Japan: Zen Buddhist teachers may have brought the breed sometime after A.D. 520, a Korean prince may have taken some to Japan in A.D. 732 or a Chinese emperor may have presented a pair to a Japanese emperor about a thousand years ago.
Rate:  (3.5)
Japanese Bobtail
Exactly when and where the Japanese Bobtail developed is not known. Itís clear, however, that the breed has been bobbing around the Far East for at least several centuries, and perhaps much longer, since early Japanese folklore contains numerous references to short-tailed cats. One well-known tale tells of a small, short-tailed female cat named Maneki-Neko that was said to have beckoned to passersby and that was associated with good fortune. A representation of Maneki-Neko, with one paw raised in welcome, appears on the facade of the Gotokuji Temple near Tokyo.
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American Bobtail
Until recently the American Bobtail has received little attention, so most people are surprised to learn that it has been catting around America for as long as the better-known Japanese Bobtail (see page 136), first imported to the United States in the late 1960s. The American Bobtail appeared on the scene in the 1960s as well, but because of the haphazard debut of the Bobtail, the word is just now beginning to spread about this breed.
Rate:  (3.6)
Akita
Akita Inu, Japanese Akita
The Akita is perhaps the most renowned and venerated of the native Japanese breeds. Although it bears a likeness to dogs from ancient Japanese tombs, the modern Akita traces back to the 17th century, when a nobleman with a keen interest in dogs was exiled to the Akita Prefecture of the island of Honshu, a rugged area with intensely cold winters. He challenged the landowners there to compete in breeding a race of powerful hunting dogs. These dogs distinguished themselves in the hunting of bear, deer and wild boar, holding the game at bay for the hunter.
Rate:  (4.4)


Total results: 6