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White-Tailed spiders
Family Lamponidae
There are many species of white-tailed spiders and they are found throughout Australia. Some species are common in urban areas and are often seen in houses. White-tailed spiders usually wander at night, hunting and eating other spiders. The two common species, the Southern and Eastern White-tailed Spiders, Lampona cylindrata and L. murina, are similar in appearance and have overlapping distributions in the south-eastern Australia. Their bites have been controversially and often incorrectly implicated in causing ulceration in humans. White-tailed spiders are vagrant hunters that live beneath...
Rate:  (4.4)
Cats - Hunting and Diet
Relative to size, domestic cats are very effective predators. They ambush and dispatch vertebrate prey using tactics similar to those of leopards and tigers by pouncing; they then deliver a lethal neck bite with their long canine teeth that severs the victim's spinal cord, or asphyxiate it by crushing the windpipe. The domestic cat can hunt and eat about one thousand species—many big cats will eat fewer than 100. Although, theoretically, big cats can kill most of these species as well, they often do not due to the relatively low nutritional content that smaller animals provide. An excep...
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Dales Pony
Native to the upper dales of Northern Yorkshire, England, is the Dales Pony. The ancestors of the Dales pony include to a large degree the Pennine Pony, with infusions of several other breeds including the Galloway, Norfolk Trotter and Wilson Pony blood. Dales ponies were bred specifically for the Pennine lead industry as pack ponies, and they soon became famous for their ability to quickly navigate rough country under heavy weights. With the advent of railways and better roads, the ponies found a niche on the small farms of the inhospitable upper dales; the strength and surefootedness of the ...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
Wire Fox Terrier
The ultimate show dog, the wire fox terrier has its roots as an effective hunting dog. Its forebears were adept at bolting and perhaps dispatching game, especially fox that had gone to ground. Some speculation exists that the smooth and wire fox terriers arose from distinct backgrounds, with the wire descending from the rough-coated black and tan terrier of Wales. The wire entered the show ring about 15 to 20 years after the smooth made its debut.
Rate:  (3.7)
Irish Terrier
The quintessential long-legged terrier, the Irish terrier is also one of the oldest terrier breeds. Its creation is not documented, but it may have descended from the old black and tan terrier and a larger but racier solid wheaten-colored terrier, both of which were found in Ireland and used for hunting fox, otter and vermin. Its similarity to the Irish wolfhound has led to conjecture that it may have descended at least in part from that breed. The Irish terrier is the raciest member of the terrier group, with a longer body and longer legs than the other terriers.
Rate:  (4)
Rhodesian Ridgeback (African lion hound)
When European Boer settlers arrived in South Africa in the 16th and 17th centuries, they brought with them such breeds as the mastiff, Great Dane, bloodhound, pointer, staghound and greyhound, among others. These settlers needed a dog that could withstand both hot and cold temperatures, limited water and rough bush, while performing the duties of guard dog and hunting dog. By breeding their European dogs with native Hottentot tribal hunting dogs (which were distinguished by a ridge of hair growing in the opposite direction along the top of their back) they produced just such a dog.
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English Foxhound
Careful pedigrees have been kept of English foxhounds since the late 1700s — longer than for any other breed. Still, the exact origin of the breed is unknown. At the time of its inception, coursing the stag with greyhounds was still the favored dog sport of the gentry. Around 1750, a few men envisioned hunting foxes with swift horses and hounds. The hounds would have to be able to track a faint scent while on the run and to maintain their chase for hours.
Rate:  (4.6)
Beagle
By the 14th century, hare hunting had become a popular sport in England, and the dogs used were probably of beagle type. The origin of the name beagle may be from Old French words meaning "open throat" in reference to the breed's melodious bay, or from the Celtic, Old English or Old French words for "small." The word beagle was not used until 1475, however, but can then be found frequently in writings from the 16th century on.
Rate:  (4.3)
Bloodhound
The quintessential scenthound, the bloodhound traces its roots to ancient times. Its earliest ancestor may have been the black St. Hubert hound documented in Europe by the eighth century. William the Conqueror is credited with bringing these hounds to England in 1066. In the 12th century, many church dignitaries were interested in hunting with these dogs, and most monasteries kept carefully bred packs. So highly bred were these dogs that they came to be known as "blooded hounds," referring to their pure blood and noble breeding.
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Great Dane
Dubbed the "Apollo of Dogs," the Great Dane is probably the product of two other magnificent breeds, the old English mastiff and the Irish wolfhound. Its ancestors were used as war dogs and hunting dogs; thus, its ability as a fearless big-game hunter seemed only natural. By the 14th century, these dogs were proving themselves as able hunters in Germany, combining speed, stamina, strength and courage in order to bring down the tough wild boar. The noble dogs became popular with the landed gentry not only because of their hunting ability but also because of their imposing yet graceful appearanc...
Rate:  (4.2)
Akita
Akita Inu, Japanese Akita
The Akita is perhaps the most renowned and venerated of the native Japanese breeds. Although it bears a likeness to dogs from ancient Japanese tombs, the modern Akita traces back to the 17th century, when a nobleman with a keen interest in dogs was exiled to the Akita Prefecture of the island of Honshu, a rugged area with intensely cold winters. He challenged the landowners there to compete in breeding a race of powerful hunting dogs. These dogs distinguished themselves in the hunting of bear, deer and wild boar, holding the game at bay for the hunter.
Rate:  (4.4)
Airedale
Known as the "king of terriers," the Airedale is the tallest terrier. Like many terriers, it counts the old English, or black and tan, terrier as one of its primary progenitors. These medium-sized dogs were prized by Yorkshire hunters for hunting a variety of game from water rats to fox. Around the mid-1800s, some of these terriers around the River Aire in South Yorkshire were crossed with otterhounds in order to improve their hunting ability around water, as well as their scenting ability. The result was a dog adept at otter hunting, originally called the Bingley or Waterside terrier but reco...
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Afghan Hound
With roots dating to the Egyptian pharaohs, the Afghan hound is an ancient breed derived from the group of Middle Eastern sighthounds. Despite such illustrious roots, most of the Afghan hound's development is the result of its use by nomadic tribes as a coursing hound capable of providing hare and gazelle meat for the pot. The dogs often hunted with the aid of falcons, which were trained to swoop at the quarry. Generations of hunting in the harsh mountainous terrain of Afghanistan produced a fast dog that also had a good deal of stamina, but most of all, had incredible leaping ability and ...
Rate:  (3.5)
Chow Chow
The chow chow has some spitz characteristics. Because of this, it has been proposed that the chow chow either descends from spitz forebears or is itself an ancestor of some of the spitz breeds. Unfortunately, the origin of the breed has been lost in time, but it has been known in China for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. Its original purpose may have been as a hunting dog, sniffing out and even pointing birds for the nobility. The breed declined in quality and numbers after the imperial hunts were ended, but a few pure descendants were kept in isolated monasteries and wealthy households.
Rate:  (3.5)
Alaskan malamute
Like most of the dogs of the spitz family, the Alaskan malamute evolved in the Arctic regions, shaped by the adverse climatic conditions. Its origin is unknown, but it was first described living among the native Inuit people known as the Mahlemuts, who lived along Norton Sound on Alaska's northwest coast. The word Mahlemut comes from Mahle, an Inuit tribe name, and mut, meaning village. The dogs served as hunting partners for big game (such as seals and polar bears), and hauled the heavy carcasses back home. These dogs were, of necessity, large and strong rather than fast, enabling one dog...
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Coyote
The term "wily coyote" was possibly coined in response to this intelligent canid's problem-solving abilities when hunting prey. Coyotes will ambush a ground squirrel by waiting at one of the burrow's exits as a badger digs its way in at the entrance. When hunting in pairs, one typically distracts the attention of the prey while the other coyote sneaks up from behind. They will also wade in the water to catch fish and forage along the banks for crayfish or turtle eggs, In general, they eat a variety of food items, including small rodents, rabbits, and carrion, as well as...
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Location: Foxes & Wolves
Arctic Fox (Alopex lagopus)
A shortened snout and tiny round ears (smallest among foxes) help the arctic fox reduce heat loss, hair on the soles of its feet insulate against the cold ground, and a very thick winter fur keeps it so warm that it doesn't begin to shiver until the temperature drops to about minus ninety degrees Fahrenheit (-70°C). This fox is the only canid with a coat that changes color seasonally; its winter coat is white and its summer coat is blue-gray or gray-brown. A nocturnal burrower, the arctic fox is occasionally seen by day hunting small mammals. Its diet also includes birds and th...
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Location: Foxes & Wolves
Jaguar
One of the largest members in the family Felidae, the jaguar is a proficient hunter of a variety of small and large vertebrates on the ground and in the trees. Highly territorial over an extensive home range of up to about eighty square miles (200 sq km), it lives a solitary life — except during the breeding season, when male and female come together to mate and reproduce. After the young are born, the female becomes highly aggressive toward any perceived threat — which can include the father. The young may stay with the mother for up to two years as they hone their hunting skills....
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Big Cats
Anaconda
Order: Squamata, Family: Boidae
Anacondas may grow to more than 29 feet, weigh 550 pounds or more, and measure more than 12 inches in diameter. The female typically outweighs the male. The anaconda has a large head and thick neck; its eyes and nostrils are positioned on top of its head. It is extremely muscular.
Rate:  (3.8)
Blackbuck
In most antelope species, all members are similarly colored, but in Antilope cervicapra the dominant male is black and white, while the female and young are light brown and white. Males are also distinguished by their twisted spiraling horns, which measure up to twenty-four inches (60 cm). Herds of blackbucks may number up to fifty individuals. As young males mature, they are pushed out of the herd by the dominant male. Today blackbucks are rare outside of game reserves and parks, where they can sometimes be seen grazing in the early morning and late afternoon.
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Total results: 20