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Bears
Bears can be found throughout the world. They are generally large animals, and a...


Battle at Kruger
A battle between a pride of lions, a herd of buffalo, and 2 crocodiles at a watering hole in South Africa's Kruger National Park while on safari.
Rate:  (2.8)
Location: Movies / Videos
Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin
Steve Irwin talks about his passion. This clip is taken from THE CROCODILE HUNTER DVD "STEVE'S STORY"
Rate:  (4.1)
Crocodile Hunter: Most Embarrassing Moments
Here is a hilarious segment from the Crocodile Hunter program showing Steve Irwin making various bloopers. I hope this can cheer up some people who are mourning Steve's death, I know it worked for me.
Rate:  (4.6)
Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)
Koalas vary in size and colour depending on where Australia they live in Australia. Koalas found in the southern distributions (Southern NSW and Victoria) tend to be slightly larger and darker than those in the northern areas (Northern NSW and QLD). This is likely to be related to the different temperatures and is a feature exhibited by many species whose distribution encompasses large climatic variations. The most notable physical aspect of the Koala would have to be its big fluffy ears. Koalas have a great sense of hearing and an even better sense of smell. This is how they select which l...
Rate:  (3.7)
Cats - Hunting and Diet
Relative to size, domestic cats are very effective predators. They ambush and dispatch vertebrate prey using tactics similar to those of leopards and tigers by pouncing; they then deliver a lethal neck bite with their long canine teeth that severs the victim's spinal cord, or asphyxiate it by crushing the windpipe. The domestic cat can hunt and eat about one thousand species—many big cats will eat fewer than 100. Although, theoretically, big cats can kill most of these species as well, they often do not due to the relatively low nutritional content that smaller animals provide. An excep...
Rate:  (4)
Wire Fox Terrier
The ultimate show dog, the wire fox terrier has its roots as an effective hunting dog. Its forebears were adept at bolting and perhaps dispatching game, especially fox that had gone to ground. Some speculation exists that the smooth and wire fox terriers arose from distinct backgrounds, with the wire descending from the rough-coated black and tan terrier of Wales. The wire entered the show ring about 15 to 20 years after the smooth made its debut.
Rate:  (3.7)
Samoyed
The nomadic Samoyed people, for whom the Samoyed dog is named, came to northwestern Siberia from central Asia. They depended upon herds of reindeer for food and had to keep on the move so that the reindeer could find sufficient food for themselves. They also depended upon strong hardy spitz dogs to herd the reindeer and to guard them against the fierce predators of the Arctic. They occasionally helped to hunt bears and tow boats and sledges.
Rate:  (4.4)
American Cocker Spaniel
The American version of the cocker spaniel is derived from the English cocker spaniel. In the late 1800s, many English cockers were brought to America, but American hunters preferred a slightly smaller dog to hunt quail and other small game birds. Just how this smaller cocker was developed is not entirely clear; some credit the dog Obo 2nd, born around 1880, as the first true American cocker. But other evidence points to crosses of the English cocker with even smaller toy spaniels (that nonetheless arose from the same ancestral stock).
Rate:  (3.8)
Akita
Akita Inu, Japanese Akita
The Akita is perhaps the most renowned and venerated of the native Japanese breeds. Although it bears a likeness to dogs from ancient Japanese tombs, the modern Akita traces back to the 17th century, when a nobleman with a keen interest in dogs was exiled to the Akita Prefecture of the island of Honshu, a rugged area with intensely cold winters. He challenged the landowners there to compete in breeding a race of powerful hunting dogs. These dogs distinguished themselves in the hunting of bear, deer and wild boar, holding the game at bay for the hunter.
Rate:  (4.4)
Gray Wolf
The largest canid in the world, the gray wolf spends most of its life in packs, usually of five to ten individuals, that are led by the so-called alpha pair, the only male and female in the pack to breed. Occasionally the wolf hunts and forages alone. However, when preying on large animals such as moose and deer, it will hunt with the pack, using a variety of strategies, such as pushing its prey toward a rendez-vous point where other pack members wait in ambush. The wolf uses a haunting howl to keep the pack together. High-ranking adults also communicate by scent-marking with u...
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Foxes & Wolves
Kit Fox
The color of the kit fox, also known as the swift fox, varies according to region. Nocturnal carnivores, kit foxes prey on rodents, rabbits, hares, and sometimes ground-nesting birds and reptiles. During the day, they shelter in burrows, which may have up to twenty-four entrances. Each burrow is typically occupied by a single fox. Cubs are born blind and helpless, and the mother rarely leaves the den while nursing. During this time, the male hunts and provides food and nourishment for the nursing female. At about one month, the cubs are sufficiently developed to venture outside...
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Location: Foxes & Wolves
Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda)
Canidae (Dogs and Relatives)
The fennec fox, smallest of all canids, is well adapted to desert life: Its body is small; its hair is light-colored to reduce heat absorption; and its large ears are highly vascularized to facilitate cooling. Also, its feet have hairy soles for traction and heat protection in sand, and it can sustain long periods without drinking. These foxes dig multichambered dens in the sand and rest there during the day, shielded from the sun. At night they venture forth to hunt insects and small vertebrates. Once they locate their prey, they dig in the sand at high speed to catch it. Fenn...
Rate:  (4.7)
Location: Foxes & Wolves
Lion
Social groups of lions, called prides, are composed of one to three males, two to fifteen females, and their offspring. Sometimes young males form their own satellite group. The males protect the territory and get to eat first; the lionesses do most of the hunting. They generally stalk and chase their prey, killing with a bite to the neck — although they can also kill with a single back-breaking swat of the paw. Lions usually hunt at night and spend almost twenty hours a day sleeping or lounging with their playful cubs.
Rate:  (4.2)
Location: Big Cats
Cheetah
The cheetah can reach speeds of sixty-eight miles (110 km) per hour, making it the fastest mammal in the world. It has non-retractable claws (unlike those of other cats), which provide it with better traction when it runs on soft ground. Unlike most large cats, which hunt by ambush, the cheetah chases its prey at high speed, using its tail as a stabilizer, especially when making tight turns.
Rate:  (3.7)
Location: Big Cats
Anaconda
Order: Squamata, Family: Boidae
Anacondas may grow to more than 29 feet, weigh 550 pounds or more, and measure more than 12 inches in diameter. The female typically outweighs the male. The anaconda has a large head and thick neck; its eyes and nostrils are positioned on top of its head. It is extremely muscular.
Rate:  (4.1)
Blackbuck
In most antelope species, all members are similarly colored, but in Antilope cervicapra the dominant male is black and white, while the female and young are light brown and white. Males are also distinguished by their twisted spiraling horns, which measure up to twenty-four inches (60 cm). Herds of blackbucks may number up to fifty individuals. As young males mature, they are pushed out of the herd by the dominant male. Today blackbucks are rare outside of game reserves and parks, where they can sometimes be seen grazing in the early morning and late afternoon.
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Total results: 16