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Yeti Crab
Kiwa hirsuta is a crustacean discovered in 2005 in the South Pacific Ocean. This decapod, which is approximately 15 cm (6 inches) long, is notable for the quantity of silky blond setae (resembling fur) covering its pereiopods (thoracic legs, including claws). Its discoverers dubbed it the "yeti lobster" or "yeti crab"[2]. K. hirsuta was discovered in March 2005 by a group organised by Robert Vrijenhoek of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in Monterey, California, using the submarine DSV Alvin, operating from RV Atlantis[3]. The discovery was announced on the 7th of March, 2006. ...
Rate:  (4)
Location: Water Life
Spiders - Survival strategies
Spiders use many strategies to protect themselves from their enemies. One of the most amazing of these is called autotomy. This is the spider's ability to self-amputate a leg that has been grabbed by a bird or other predator. Usually the leg breaks off close to the body, at the coxa-trochanter joint. Even more amazingly, juvenile spiders can regenerate their legs - a tiny, segmented leg grows within the coxal stump and appears at the next moult. Other strategies include behavioural ploys, like direct threat displays of warning colours on the spider's body, or escaping a predator by...
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Boomslang (Dispholidus typus)
By: C.M.Shorter
The Boomslang Snake is a rather large, highly poisonous tree dwelling snake found throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Boomslangs are greenish to brown or even black in color. These coloring variations are the greatest of any other snakes in their Afrotropic regional habitat. It is the adult females that are usually brown in color, with males a light green color often with black or blue highlights outlining the edges of their scales. This snake is a one deadly animal because of its preference for aerial positioning in tree top and shrub cover. Hard to see in the thick forested cover of the savanna, ...
Rate:  (3.4)
Maybe Birdbrains Are in Fact Clever
by Gareth Huw Davies
The scene: a traffic light crossing on a university campus in Japan. Carrion crows and humans line up patiently, waiting for the traffic to halt. When the lights change, the birds hop in front of the cars and place walnuts, which they picked from the adjoining trees, on the road. After the lights turn green again, the birds fly away and vehicles drive over the nuts, cracking them open. Finally, when itís time to cross again, the crows join the pedestrians and pick up their meal. If the cars miss the nuts, the birds sometimes hop back and put them somewhere else on the road. Or they sit...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Chartreux
As the legend goes, the Chartreux, (pronounced shär-TRUE) breed developed at Le Grand Chartreux monastery in the French Alps just outside Paris. The Carthusian order of monks at the monastery, in their spare time between praying, liqueur-making, and weapon-forging, bred Chartreux cats with the same skill and dedication with which they created their world-famous yellow and green Chartreuse liqueurs.
Rate:  (2.8)
Green Tree Frog (Hyla cinerea)
Order: Anura, Family: Hylidae
Nearctic: Delaware, eastern Maryland and Virgina, eastern North and South Carolina, southern Georgia, all of Florida, Alabama west to eastern Texas,and extending up the Mississippi Valley to extreme southern Illinois. Possibly northeastern Mexico.
Rate:  (3)
Location: Amphibians
Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)
Order: Anseriformes, Family: Anatidae
You can easily spot a male wood duck by his exquisite coloring. He has a white throat and chin and bright green and purple feathers. The female, like most female ducks, is more or less brown. She has a white patch on her throat, and a prominent white eye-ring. Male and female wood ducks have well-defined head crests and long, dark, square tails that help identify them in flight. Wood ducks are some of the smallest ducks of all. They never weigh more than 2 pounds, and measure 17 to 20 inches in length. They ride higher in the water than other ducks and are "dabblers," meaning they don&#...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)
Order: Ciconiiformes, Family: Ardeidae
There are several types of herons in the southeastern states: green heron, little blue heron, tricolored heron, yellow-crowned heron, black-crowned night heron and the great blue heron, which is one of the most prominent. Approximately 4 feet high, the great blue heron is the largest heron in North America. It has a wingspan of about 6 feet. Above, the great blue heron is bluish gray, while its belly is black. Its head is white, with a black stripe along the sides of the crown. During the breeding season, this stripe extends to elongated black plumes.
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Location: Birds & Bats
Temple Viper (Tropidolaemus wagleri)
Order: Squamata, Family: Viperidae
The temple viper has a large head and stout body. The viper's yellow-and-green body bears white, red, dark green or black spots or cross bands. The top of its head is black with green markings, its ventral shields are white with black edges, and its tail is black. The temple viper is venomous and dangerous, but not aggressive.
Rate:  (4.5)
Green Tree Pit Viper / Common Bamboo Viper (Trimeresurus gramineus)
The green tree pit viper is uniform bright or dull green with light yellow on its lips. It grows to 18 to 30 inches in length. The green tree pit viper's range includes India, Myanmar, Malaya, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, China, Indonesia and Formosa.
Rate:  (3.1)
Common Lancehead / Fer-de-Lance (Bothrops atrox)
Order: Squamata, Family: Viperidae
The common lancehead is usually brown, reddish-brown, olive, green or grayish-brown in color with large, dark, pale triangles on the sides of its body. Its head is triangular and pointed. The lancehead measures 4 to 7 feet long.
Rate:  (3.4)
Rat Snake (Elaphe obsoleta)
Order: Squamata, Family: Colubridae
The rat snake varies in color from almost solid black to brown, green or yellow and may have stripes or blotches. The snake's coloration tends to reflect its environment. Rat snakes grow to about 3 to 8 feet in length. They have round pupils.
Rate:  (3.5)
Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas)
Order: Chelonia, Family: Cheloniidae
Green turtles have a single pair of scales in front of their eyes rather than two pairs like other sea turtles have. The green turtle is the largest hard-shelled sea turtle; adults commonly grow over 3 feet in length and weigh over 300 pounds. Green turtles are outfitted with large, heart-shaped shells covered with horny plates. The shells are black, gray or brown (not green) ó the green turtle gets its name from the green color of fat underneath its shell.
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Turtles
Komodo Dragon / Komodo Monitor / Ora (Varanus komodoensis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Varanidae
Male Komodo dragons typically grow to 7 to 9 feet in length and weigh approximately 200 pounds. However, they can weigh more than 350 pounds and grow to over 10 feet long; females grow to 6 to 8 feet. Females are olive-brown with yellow patches on the throat; males are much larger and vary in color from dark gray to brick red; young are colorful, with hues of yellow, green and white banding and dots on a dark background. The Komodo's tail makes up half its body length. It has a long neck; strong, sharp claws; 52 razor-sharp serrated teeth; and a long, yellow tongue.
Rate:  (4.5)
Location: Lizards
Day Gecko (Phelsuma madagascariensis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Geckonidae
The day gecko has a flat body covered with smooth skin and small scales. It has a relatively large head and round, large, vividly colored eyes covered by a transparent, fixed plate and no eyelids. The day gecko usually grows to between 4 and 6 inches long; its tail makes up roughly half that length. Its coloring ranges from olive green to turquoise, and it usually has red spots on its back. Young are born with a yellowish-green head, and brown neck and back with a series of light bars.
Rate:  (3.8)
Location: Lizards
Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus)
Order: Crocodolia, Family: Crocodylidae
Average weight: between 600 and 2,000 pounds. Nile crocs are characterized by their lizard-shaped bodies and scaly hides. Coloring: ranges from drab green or brownish to a blackish tone on the dorsal side, much lighter on the ventral side. The eyes and nostrils of crocodiles are situated on the top of the head so they can see and breathe while the rest of their body remains almost totally underwater. In the water, crocs have large, oar-like tails that they use to swim. Only their rear feet are webbed, and they are rarely used in movement underwater.
Rate:  (3)


Total results: 16