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White-faced Saki Monkey
The White-faced Saki (Pithecia pithecia), also known as the Guianan Saki and the Golden-faced Saki, is a species of saki monkey, a type of New World monkey, found in Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, and Venezuela. This monkey mostly feed on fruits, but also nuts, seeds, and insects.
Rate:  (3.6)
Location: Monkeys
Angora Rabbit
The Angora rabbit is a variety of domestic rabbit bred for its long, soft hair. The Angora is one of the oldest types of domestic rabbit, originating in Ankara, Turkey, along with the Angora cat and Angora goat. The rabbits were popular pets with French royalty in the mid 1700s, and spread to other parts of Europe by the end of the century. They first appeared in the United States in the early 1900s. They are bred largely for their long wool, which may be removed by shearing or plucking (gently pulling loose wool). There are many individual breeds of Angora rabbits, four of which are ARBA ...
Rate:  (4.2)
harier
The word harier was Norman for dog or hound, so it is difficult to unravel the ancient history of hounds in general. nonetheless, the harrier may be one of the older scenthounds still in existence today, with references dating from 13th-century England. They probably stem from the long-extinct Talbot and St. Hubert hounds, and perhaps the Brachet and later, the French basset. This lineage produced a dog that tracked hare by scent at a pace that enabled hunters to follow on foot.
Rate:  (2.8)
Beagle
By the 14th century, hare hunting had become a popular sport in England, and the dogs used were probably of beagle type. The origin of the name beagle may be from Old French words meaning "open throat" in reference to the breed's melodious bay, or from the Celtic, Old English or Old French words for "small." The word beagle was not used until 1475, however, but can then be found frequently in writings from the 16th century on.
Rate:  (4.3)
Chartreux
As the legend goes, the Chartreux, (pronounced shär-TRUE) breed developed at Le Grand Chartreux monastery in the French Alps just outside Paris. The Carthusian order of monks at the monastery, in their spare time between praying, liqueur-making, and weapon-forging, bred Chartreux cats with the same skill and dedication with which they created their world-famous yellow and green Chartreuse liqueurs.
Rate:  (2.8)
Keeshond
The keeshond (plural: keeshonden) is one of the family of spitz dogs, although its exact origin is undocumented. It seems to have been well-established in Holland at least since the 18th century as a companion and watchdog. The breed later became known as the barge dog because it was often kept as a watchdog on the small vessels navigating the Rhine River. By a stroke of fate, the breed became entangled in the political events of Holland in the years preceding the French Revolution. The leader of the patriot faction was a man named Kees de Gyselaer, who in turn owned a barge dog named Kees.
Rate:  (4.1)
French Bulldog
In the 19th century, the bulldog was fairly popular in England, especially around Nottingham. Some of these bulldogs were quite small, weighing less than 25 pounds. When many of the lace workers of the region went to France for work in the mid-1800s, they took their "toy" bulldogs with them. The French women, especially, were attracted to these little bulldogs, especially those with erect ears (a common but disliked feature in England). Dog dealers brought more of the clownish little dogs to France, where they soon became the rage of Paris.
Rate:  (3.4)


Total results: 7