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Knabstrup
The Knabstrup originated in Denmark. It traces back to the age of the Vikings. The original size of the Knabstrup horse was about 14.3 hands. It had clean, dry limbs; large, strong hind quarters; and a small, refined head. Basic qualities included an easy and tractable temperament, and these horses were know for their speed and endurance. Since 1100 A.D. the principal lines of distribution extended rapidly when China opened its borders for trade. The Chinese used spotted horses to transport silk and other articles. Part of their main route crossed through France and Spain, which is interesti...
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Camargue
Some say that the Camargue horse has an oriental or Saracen origin, due to the forsaking of Arab horses during the barbaresque invasion in the south of France in the 8th century. We can presume that those horsemen only rode males, not females. So, if crossings have been done, they were absorbed into the local horses. According to some scientific research, the origin of the Camargue horse would be the solutre horse, who lived in a marshy land, near the Quanternary Sea. Both have the same characteristics (same skeleton, same stature...) From his cradle, they went down to the Rhone Delta.
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Sphynx
The Sphynx is not the first instance of hairlessness in domestic cats. This natural, spontaneous mutation has been seen in various locations around the world for at least the last ninety-something years, and probably longer. The Book of the Cat (Simpson, 1903), mentioned a pair of hairless cats belonging to a New Mexico fancier. Called the “Mexican Hairless,” these cats supposedly were obtained from Indians around Albuquerque.
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French Bulldog
In the 19th century, the bulldog was fairly popular in England, especially around Nottingham. Some of these bulldogs were quite small, weighing less than 25 pounds. When many of the lace workers of the region went to France for work in the mid-1800s, they took their "toy" bulldogs with them. The French women, especially, were attracted to these little bulldogs, especially those with erect ears (a common but disliked feature in England). Dog dealers brought more of the clownish little dogs to France, where they soon became the rage of Paris.
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Affenpinscher
The affenpinscher's name describes it well: affen, meaning "monkey," and pinscher, meaning "terrier." In France the affenpinscher is known as the diablotin moustachu — "moustached little devil" — which also aptly describes it! As one of the oldest toy breeds, the affenpinscher's origins are obscure. Paintings by the old Dutch masters from the 15th century often included dogs resembling affenpinschers, but more definite evidence of the breed is absent. Small terriers adept at dispatching rats were abundant in central Europe by the 17th century. In Germany, they were used to rid stables ...
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American Foxhound
This most American of breeds dates back to 1650, with the first record of fox-chasing hounds arriving from England. By the 1700s, riding to the hounds had become extremely popular with the upper class; even George Washington found it a favorite pastime. Imports from England, France and Ireland helped shape the breed. Foxhound pedigrees have been recorded in America since 1850. Around this same time, the sport spread to the southern United States, particularly the mountains of Kentucky and Tennessee, and hunters there preferred a faster dog with the ability to start, chase and kill a fox alone,...
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Total results: 6