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Horses & Ponies
Horses belong to the equus family. Equus comes from the ancient Greek word meani...


Horse + Zebra = Zorse
This animal with distinctive markings is a zorse - the off-spring of a female zebra and a male horse.

Little Eclyse is the latest addition to a German safari park. Eclyse is also special as zorses, or zebroids as they are also known, are usually born when a horse mare breeds with a zebra stallion.
Rate:  (3.2)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Dealing with non-venomous snake bites
To start out with, I feel that most cases of snakebite are NOT the snake's fault, but rather the fault of the person who is working with or around the snake. People can easily avoid snakebites by using some common sense. Over the years, several snakes have bitten me. I have suffered bites from various rat snakes, kingsnakes, racers, gophers, water, garters, ribbons, Burmese pythons, ball pythons, and rosy boas. I did have a female western hognose snake that seemed to have a strange fascination with wanting to chew on my fingers; however, I have never allowed her the opportunity to latch...
Rate:  (4.1)
Orang-utan (Pongo pygmaeus)
"Forest people" from Borneo and Sumatra
The translation of the Malayan word "Orang-utan" is "forest man". And indeed do the large Great apes show a lot of human characteristics concerning their facial expression as well as their gestures. Adult male Orang-utans are imposing figures with their reddish shaggy fur, broad cheeks and long beards. In the wild they reach weights up to 80 kg. Male Orang-utans living in zoos and suffering from lack of exercise are often even heavier. Female Orang-utans are much smaller than the males. The face of young Orang-utans is fair-skinned but, like in Chimpanzees, gets darker the older they get.
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Monkeys
Cassowary: Friend or Foe?
The Kuranda area of far north Queensland is a key zone for the endangered Cassowary, the birds around Cassowary House have raised 7 chicks since June 1998, with another male a couple of kilometres along the same road having a similar record and currently having 4 chicks. In January 2002 we had a new female appear, and occasionally join with the family group, though the regular female soon drives her away when they coincide here. The individual birds are readily recognisable by their casque shapes and patterns, with males having a drooping bustle and females being considerably larger and havi...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Ocicat
The first Ocicat was created in 1964 when Virginia Daly, a Michigan breeder interested in new and unusual varieties of cats, tried to create a Siamese with Abyssinian-colored points. Daly bred a seal point Siamese female to a ruddy Abyssinian male; the subsequent kittens looked like Abyssinians but carried the gene for the Siamese pattern. She then bred one of the half-Abyssinian kittens to another full Siamese and achieved her goal of producing an Abyssinian-pointed Siamese kitten.
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Japanese Bobtail
Exactly when and where the Japanese Bobtail developed is not known. It’s clear, however, that the breed has been bobbing around the Far East for at least several centuries, and perhaps much longer, since early Japanese folklore contains numerous references to short-tailed cats. One well-known tale tells of a small, short-tailed female cat named Maneki-Neko that was said to have beckoned to passersby and that was associated with good fortune. A representation of Maneki-Neko, with one paw raised in welcome, appears on the facade of the Gotokuji Temple near Tokyo.
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Himalayan
The first deliberate cross between a Siamese and a Persian was made in 1924 by a Swedish geneticist, but it wasn’t until 1935 that the first pointed pattern longhair was born. In the early 1930s two Harvard medical employees crossed a Siamese female with a black Persian male, not to create a new breed, but to establish how certain characteristics were inherited. This mating produced a litter of black, shorthaired kittens. They then bred a black Persian female with a Siamese male. The outcome was the same. This is not surprising, since long hair and the colorpoint pattern are both governed by r...
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Devon Rex
The Devon didn’t settle into the unsuspecting laps of us humans until 1960. The father of the Devon breed, a feral, curly-coated tom, lived around an abandoned tin mine near Devonshire, England. He mated with a straight-coated calico female that produced a litter of kittens in the garden of cat fancier Beryl Cox. One of the kittens, a brownish-black male that Cox named Kirlee, had the same short, curly coat as his father. Breeders think that the calico female and the curly-coated male must have been related, since the Devon Rex gene that governs the curly coat is recessive and must be present ...
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Burmese
The modern Burmese saga began in 1930 with a female cat named Wong Mau. This brown feline was brought to the United States from Yangon, Myanmar (the former Rangoon, Burma). Some sources say Wong Mau was brought to the United States by a sailor and was given to a U.S. Navy doctor named Dr. Joseph Thompson. Other sources say that Dr. Thompson himself brought Wong Mau back from Myanmar. The latter is likely true, given Dr. Thompson’s interest in the Far East and its cats.
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Bombay
The Bombay was created in the 1950s by the late Nikki Horner, an American breeder who wanted to develop a cat that possessed the conformation of the Burmese but with a sleek black coat and copper eyes instead of brown fur and yellow eyes—sort of a pint-sized panther. She named the breed after Bombay, India, land of the black leopard. She first attempted to breed a female Burmese to a black American Shorthair. The results were disappointing; they looked more like poor American Shorthairs than anything else.
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Gray Wolf
The largest canid in the world, the gray wolf spends most of its life in packs, usually of five to ten individuals, that are led by the so-called alpha pair, the only male and female in the pack to breed. Occasionally the wolf hunts and forages alone. However, when preying on large animals such as moose and deer, it will hunt with the pack, using a variety of strategies, such as pushing its prey toward a rendez-vous point where other pack members wait in ambush. The wolf uses a haunting howl to keep the pack together. High-ranking adults also communicate by scent-marking with u...
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Foxes & Wolves
Tomato Frog (Dyscophus antongilli)
Order: Anura, Family: Microphylidae
Tomato frogs are sexually dimorphic. The female ranges from reddish-orange to bright vermilion, and the male from dull orange to brownish-orange. Both males and females have a yellowish underside and black throat. Juveniles are dull in color, developing brighter coloration as they mature. The female tomato frog is larger than the male, measuring 3 to 4 inches long. The male is 2 to 21/2 inches long. The tomato frog has a squat body and narrow mouth; it has ridges of folds on the roof of its mouth.
Rate:  (3.9)
Location: Amphibians
American Black Bear (Ursus americanus)
Order: Carnivora, Family: Ursidae
The American black bear is one of the most common bear species; it is also one of the world's largest terrestrial carnivores. When standing upright, black bears measure approximately 5 to 6 feet tall, with a tail length of roughly 5 inches. Depending on the food supply available in their range, female black bears weigh from 100 to 600 pounds, and males average between 250 and 700 pounds.
Rate:  (4)
Location: Bears
Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus)
Order: Piciformes, Family: Picidae
Woodpeckers range in size, from 6 to 9 inches long. Small to midsize birds, they cling to the trunks and large branches of trees and large cactus with their sharp claws. Their short legs and stiff, spine-tipped tails help them stay vertical. They have long, pointed, chisel-like bills that enable them to bore into wood. Twice the length of its bill, the woodpecker's narrow tongue is tipped with spear-like barbs, which the bird uses to impale wood-boring insects. Male and female woodpeckers look very similar, except males have a red or yellow patch on their head that is lacking o...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)
Order: Anseriformes, Family: Anatidae
You can easily spot a male wood duck by his exquisite coloring. He has a white throat and chin and bright green and purple feathers. The female, like most female ducks, is more or less brown. She has a white patch on her throat, and a prominent white eye-ring. Male and female wood ducks have well-defined head crests and long, dark, square tails that help identify them in flight. Wood ducks are some of the smallest ducks of all. They never weigh more than 2 pounds, and measure 17 to 20 inches in length. They ride higher in the water than other ducks and are "dabblers," meaning they don&#...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)
Order: Falconiformes, Family: Accipitridae
The golden eagle is about 30 to 40 inches in length and weighs between 9 and 13 pounds. Its wingspan can be as wide as 7.5 feet, which makes the golden eagle the largest predatory bird in North America. The tail of the golden eagle is grayish brown, while the head, body and other feathers on the wings are typically black in color. The feathers at the head and nape of the eagle's neck are golden brown. Adult eagles have dark brown eyes, while their bill and claws are black. Their cere (a waxy, fleshy area at the base of the beak) and feet are yellow, and their legs are feathered...
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Birds & Bats
Common Raven (Corvus corax)
Order: Passeriformes, Family: Corvidae
The raven is a large, black bird (the largest of all entirely black birds) with a wedge-shaped tail. It calls frequently, and has a peculiar hoarse, resonant croak. The sexes are very similar physically, although the female is smaller. The raven's range is widespread to say the least. It encompasses northwest Europe, Britain, Holarctic, Greenland (mainly coastal areas), Iceland, northern Scandinavia, east to Pacific, central Asia to the Himalayas and northwest India, Iran and the Near East, northwest Africa and Canary Islands, North and Central America.
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Location: Birds & Bats
Lion (Panthera Leo)
Order: Carnivora, Family: Felidae
Lions are low to the ground, but large and powerful. The average male weighs 416 pounds and stands 48 inches high. The average female weighs 277 pounds and measures 44 inches tall. The lion's coat is short except for a tufted tail, and in the male's case, the mane, which it starts to grow at 3 years of age. Lions are tawny in color, with males having buff-colored underparts and females white. The backs of its ears, as well as its tail tuft and lips, are black. Manes vary from blond to black. Cubs are born with woolly gray, spotted fur, and begin to get their adult coats at 3 m...
Rate:  (3.3)
Location: Big Cats
Jaguar
One of the largest members in the family Felidae, the jaguar is a proficient hunter of a variety of small and large vertebrates on the ground and in the trees. Highly territorial over an extensive home range of up to about eighty square miles (200 sq km), it lives a solitary life — except during the breeding season, when male and female come together to mate and reproduce. After the young are born, the female becomes highly aggressive toward any perceived threat — which can include the father. The young may stay with the mother for up to two years as they hone their hunting skills....
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Big Cats
Anaconda
Order: Squamata, Family: Boidae
Anacondas may grow to more than 29 feet, weigh 550 pounds or more, and measure more than 12 inches in diameter. The female typically outweighs the male. The anaconda has a large head and thick neck; its eyes and nostrils are positioned on top of its head. It is extremely muscular.
Rate:  (3.9)

     

Total results: 27