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Kunekune Pigs
A Rare Breed of New Zealand Origin
The delightful Kunekune developed into its present form in New Zealand, although the breed is almost certainly of Asian origin*. During most of the period these pigs have been in New Zealand they were kept almost solely by Maori communities, and were to a large extent unknown by Europeans. (It is quite certain, however, that they were not in this country prior to the arrival of Europeans and they were probably introduced very early in the European period by whalers or traders.) A combined excursion, in 1984, by Staglands Wildlife Reserve and Willowbank Wildlife Reserve, led to 18 animals be...
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Location: Pigs
Euro Pigs
A Rare Breed of European Origin
The European wild pig – more correctly the European Wild Boar (which term covers both the boars and sows) – is commonly called the ‘Euro’ in New Zealand. It is a hardy breed, kept by a number of breeders here, and has been registered by the New Zealand Pig Breeders Association. All domesicated pigs, even Asian varieties, are believed to have evolved from this European breed. In spite of the fearsome reputation of the European Wild Boar, domesticated Euros make good pets.
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Location: Pigs
Tuataras (Sphenodon punctatus)
The two recognized species of tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus and Sphenodon guntheri) are found on approximately 30 small, relatively inaccesible, islands off the coast of New Zealand. The species was once widely distributed throughout New Zealand, but became extinct on the mainland before the arrival of European settlers
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Lizards
Tori
This is an all-purpose utility breed. It was developed in Estonia at Tori stud from 1890 to 1950, by crossing native Estonian mares with European halfbred stallions. The breed was founded by the stallion Hetman, the son of Stewart and an unknown hunter mare. Stewart was a crossbred of a Norfolk Trotter and an Anglo-Norman mare. The formation of the breed involved extensive use of Hetman and his sons. As a result, a valuable breeding nucleus was rapidly formed. By the end of the 1930s, however, signs of inbreeding depression were found, which manifested themselves in a deterioration of perfor...
Rate:  (4.2)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Mustang
American feral horse, BLM (Bureau of Land Management) horse, Range horse
The Mustang is a feral horse found now in the western United States. The name Mustang comes from the Spanish word mesteño or monstenco meaning wild or stray. Originally these were Spanish horses or their descendants but over the years they became a mix of numerous breeds. These were the horses which changed the lives of the Native Americans living in or near the Great Plains. As European settlers came farther west they brought their horses with them. Some were lost to Indian raids, others were freed as wild stallions tore down fences to add the tame mares tn his herd or tame horse escap...
Rate:  (3.5)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Icelandic
Islenzki hesturinn, Icelandic toelter horse, Iceland Tolter
The Icelandic horse is descended from horses brought to Iceland by settlers over eleven centuries ago. Comparison between the Icelandic horse, at the time of the settlement of Iceland, and ancient Norwegian and German horses show them to have similar bone structure. Some consider it likely that there was a separate species of horse, Ecuus scandianavicus, found in these areas. These horses were later crossed with other European breeds, except in Iceland where it remained relatively pure. Some have said that the Icelandic horse is related to the Shetland but the Icelandic has a genotype which is...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
Rhodesian Ridgeback (African lion hound)
When European Boer settlers arrived in South Africa in the 16th and 17th centuries, they brought with them such breeds as the mastiff, Great Dane, bloodhound, pointer, staghound and greyhound, among others. These settlers needed a dog that could withstand both hot and cold temperatures, limited water and rough bush, while performing the duties of guard dog and hunting dog. By breeding their European dogs with native Hottentot tribal hunting dogs (which were distinguished by a ridge of hair growing in the opposite direction along the top of their back) they produced just such a dog.
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Maltese / Bichon Maltiase
The Maltese is the most ancient of the European toy breeds, and among the oldest of all breeds. The island of Malta was an early trading port, visited by Phoenician sailors by 1500 B.C. Maltese dogs are specifically mentioned in writings as early as 300 B.C. Greek art includes dogs of Maltese type from the fifth century on; there is evidence that tombs were even erected to favor Maltese. Although the dogs were often exported and subsequently widely distributed throughout Europe and Asia, the core population on Malta remained relatively isolated from other dogs, resulting in this distinctive do...
Rate:  (3.9)
Randombred Cat
We don’t know exactly when cats first arrived in America, but we can take a pretty good guess. Cats appear in American paintings and needlework samplers of the 1600s and 1700s, indicating that cats may have arrived with the Pilgrims. Cats probably voyaged on the European fishing boats that worked the coastal waters of America and came to shore when the boats put in to dry their catches. It is thought that cats may have arrived even earlier; evidence suggests that cats may have sailed over with Columbus in 1492—bones of domesticated cats have been found at sites Columbus visited.
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European Burmese
The European Burmese is an elegant cat of foreign type, which is positive and individual to the breed. Any suggestion of either Siamese type or the cobbiness of the British Shorthair must be regarded as a fault.
Rate:  (2.6)
Balinese
Longhaired kittens began appearing spontaneously in the early 1900s in otherwise shorthaired Siamese litters. Some fanciers theorize that the gene for long hair was introduced into the Siamese gene pool in Europe after World War I. Since the Siamese was nearly obliterated as a European breed by the war (as were other breeds), breeders may have used other breeds after the war’s end to help rejuvenate the bloodline.
Rate:  (4.3)
Australian Cattle
In the early 1800s, vast land areas in Australia became available for grazing cattle. The cattle raised on these lands became so wild and intractable that the traditional European herding breeds that had proved satisfactory on tamer cattle were no longer suited for the job. A dog was needed that could withstand traveling long distances over rough terrain in hot weather and that could control cattle without barking (which only served to make wild cattle wilder).
Rate:  (3.9)
Boxer
The boxer derives from two central European breeds of dog that no longer exist: the larger Danziger bullenbaiser and the smaller Brabenter bullenbaiser. Bullenbaiser means "bull biter," and these dogs were used to grab large game (wild boars, deer and small bears) after it was at bay, hanging onto it until the hunter arrived to kill it. This required a strong but agile dog with a broad powerful jaw and a recessed nose to enable the dog to breathe while its jaws were clamped onto an animal. Similar attributes were required of dogs used in bull-baiting, a popular sport in many European countries...
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Total results: 13