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Horses & Ponies
Horses belong to the equus family. Equus comes from the ancient Greek word meani...


Pug
A Pug is a toy dog breed with a wrinkly face and medium-small body. Pug puppies are often called puglets. The word "pug" may have come from the Old English pugg, which was an affectionate term for a playful little devil or monkey. The breed is often summarized as multum in parvo ("much in little"), describing the Pug's great personality and small size. While most Pugs appearing in eighteenth century prints tended to be long and lean, the current breed standards call for a square, cobby body, a compact form, deep chest, and well-developed muscle. Their heads, carried on arched necks, ...
Rate:  (3.3)
Narwhal
The Narwhal (Monodon monoceros) is an Arctic species of cetacean. It is a creature rarely found south of latitude 70N. It is one of two species of white whale in the Monodontidae family (the other is the beluga whale). It is possibly also related to the Irrawaddy dolphin. The English name narwhal is derived from the Dutch name narwal which in turn comes from the Danish narhval which is based on the Old Norse word nar, meaning "corpse." This is a reference to the animal's colour. The narwhal is also commonly known as the Moon Whale. In some parts of the world, the Narwhal is colloq...
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Location: Whales Breeds
Tamworth Pigs
A Rare Breed of British Origin
Tamworth pigs were developed in Staffordshire, England, from around the beginning of the nineteenth century. The breed is regarded as being of a rather primitive type with a long snout and rather pricked ears, and it has been described as possibly the purest representative of the native English pig. Its most distinguishing feature is its unusual golden-red colouring. (There are several theories as to the origin of that colouring credit is given to variously to the introduction of a red boar from India, from Barbados and from Ireland.) The breed was well established by the 1870s and its fi...
Rate:  (3)
Location: Pigs
Quarter Horse
The principle development of the Quarter Horse was in the southwestern part of the United States in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, eastern Colorado, and Kansas. Some breed historians have maintained that it is the oldest breed of horses in the United States and that the true beginning of the Quarter Horse was in the Carolinas and Virginia. Nye1 has suggested that the Chickasaws secured from the Indians were the true beginning of the Quarter Horse. These were small blocky horses, probably of Spanish extraction, which the planters secured from the Indians, and which were adapted for a variety o...
Rate:  (4.1)
Location: Horses & Ponies
Bull Terrier
Bull-baiting and dog fighting were long considered great entertainment by many Europeans, and patrons were constantly trying crosses to achieve the ultimate fighting dog. Around 1835, a cross between a bulldog and the old English terrier produced a particularly adept pit dog known as the "bull and terrier." A later cross to the Spanish pointer added needed size, and the result was a tenacious, strong, yet agile dog that came to dominate the pits. As interest in the exhibition of dogs grew in England, little attention was paid to these dogs so long associated with the lower echelons of society.
Rate:  (4.3)
English Foxhound
Careful pedigrees have been kept of English foxhounds since the late 1700s longer than for any other breed. Still, the exact origin of the breed is unknown. At the time of its inception, coursing the stag with greyhounds was still the favored dog sport of the gentry. Around 1750, a few men envisioned hunting foxes with swift horses and hounds. The hounds would have to be able to track a faint scent while on the run and to maintain their chase for hours.
Rate:  (4.6)
Beagle
By the 14th century, hare hunting had become a popular sport in England, and the dogs used were probably of beagle type. The origin of the name beagle may be from Old French words meaning "open throat" in reference to the breed's melodious bay, or from the Celtic, Old English or Old French words for "small." The word beagle was not used until 1475, however, but can then be found frequently in writings from the 16th century on.
Rate:  (4.3)
Yorkshire Terrier
The Yorkshire Terrier doesn't look like a product of the working class, nor does it look like a ratter, but it is both. In fact, the Yorkshire area of England is known for producing fine animals, and it is thought that the Yorkie was no accident but rather the result of purposeful crosses between a variety of terriers, probably including the Waterside Terrier, Clydesdale Terrier, Paisley Terrier, rough-coated English Black and Tan Terrier, and perhaps even the Skye Terrier, Dandie Dinmont Terrier, and Maltese.
Rate:  (4.4)
Amstaff - American Staffordshire Terrier
The American Staffordshire terrier and the Staffordshire bull terrier descended from the same lines. The prototype originally sprang from crossing the old type of bulldog with some old terrier types, probably the English sooth terrier. The result was aptly called the "bull and terrier," later to be dubbed the Staffordshire bull terrier. The dogs gained fame among fanciers of dog fighting, a popular sport despite its having been declared illegal. Their fighting ability gained them passage to America in the late 1800s, where they dominated the fighting "pits." Here they became known as the pit b...
Rate:  (3.8)
Great Dane
Dubbed the "Apollo of Dogs," the Great Dane is probably the product of two other magnificent breeds, the old English mastiff and the Irish wolfhound. Its ancestors were used as war dogs and hunting dogs; thus, its ability as a fearless big-game hunter seemed only natural. By the 14th century, these dogs were proving themselves as able hunters in Germany, combining speed, stamina, strength and courage in order to bring down the tough wild boar. The noble dogs became popular with the landed gentry not only because of their hunting ability but also because of their imposing yet graceful appearanc...
Rate:  (4.2)
American Water Spaniel
Exactly when and where, or from what the American water spaniel was developed was never recorded. Its appearance strongly suggests a smaller version of the Irish water spaniel, and it is likely that it is derived from that breed or its earlier versions, the Northern, Southern and Tweed water spaniels. The curly-coated retriever and its forebear, the English water spaniel, may also have played a role. Some theories even credit the American Indians who lived in the Great Lakes regions as the creators of the breed.
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American Cocker Spaniel
The American version of the cocker spaniel is derived from the English cocker spaniel. In the late 1800s, many English cockers were brought to America, but American hunters preferred a slightly smaller dog to hunt quail and other small game birds. Just how this smaller cocker was developed is not entirely clear; some credit the dog Obo 2nd, born around 1880, as the first true American cocker. But other evidence points to crosses of the English cocker with even smaller toy spaniels (that nonetheless arose from the same ancestral stock).
Rate:  (3.8)
Harriet - giant Galápagos land tortoise
At 172 years of age, Harriet the giant Galápagos land tortoise is the oldest known living creature on Earth. Born in November 1830 on an island in the Galápagos, Harriet spent the earliest years of her life in the wild. In 1835, when Harriet was only 5 years old and about the size of a dinner plate, noted English naturalist Charles Darwin landed on Isla Santa Cruz, her home. Shortly thereafter, Harriet and two of her friends found themselves aboard the HMS Beagle headed for England, marked as subjects of scientific research.
Rate:  (4.4)
Location: Turtles
Fiddler Crab (Uca princeps)
Order: Decapoda, Family: Ocypodidea
Fiddler crabs are small, semi-terrestrial crabs; male fiddlers have one claw that is much larger than the other, while females have equal-sized claws. The common English name, fiddler crab, comes from the manner in which male crabs feed; male crabs move their small claw from the ground to their mouth, causing them to resemble someone sweeping a bow (the small claw) across a fiddle (the large claw). The male's large claw measures about 1 to 2 inches long, and is often as large and heavy as the rest of the crab's body. It also often contrasts in color with the rest of the crab'...
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Location: Water Life


Total results: 14