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Water Life
Under The Sea / Raven Symone The seaweed is always greener / In somebody else...


Star-nosed Mole (Condylura cristata)
The Star-nosed Mole (Condylura cristata) is a small North American mole found in eastern Canada and the north-eastern United States. It is the only member of the tribe Condylurini and the genus Condylura. It lives in wet lowland areas and eats small invertebrates, aquatic insects, worms and molluscs. It is a good swimmer and can forage along the bottoms of streams and ponds. Like other moles, this animal digs shallow surface tunnels for foraging; often, these tunnels exit underwater. It is active day and night and remains active in winter, when it has been observed tunnelling through the s...
Rate:  (3.3)
Animal Useless Facts
Humans and dolphins are the only mammals that have sex for pleasure...
Slugs have four noses. All polar bears are left handed. In a life time, the average person eats eight spiders. The longest recorded flight of a chicken is 13 seconds. Giant squid have the largest eyes in the world. All porcupines float. The world record for sitting in a cage filled with scorpions is 21 days. Elephants are the only mammals that can't jump. Humans and dolphins are the only mammals that have sex for pleasure. Termites eat through wood 2 times faster when listening to rock music. It only takes monkeys 10 seconds to mate! An octopus's testic...
Rate:  (4.1)
Kiger Mustang
Kiger Mesteño
For decades it was largely accepted that the Spanish bloodlines from which the Mustangs of the American west had descended were either lost or very diluted in the current day Mustangs. However, some people speculated that there might be isolated herds of horses which would still have a strong Spanish influence. In 1977, a herd of mustangs which appeared to be largely of Spanish descent were brought in from the remote and rugged Beaty Butte region in Lake County, Oregon. The animals were uniformly of a dun coloration, ranging from brown-dun to nearly white. All had dorsal stripes and zebra stri...
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Location: Horses & Ponies
Polish Frizzle Chicken
Created in Holland
The Frizzle Poland was created in Holland by Mr Airie Bolan. His inspiration came from a painting by Van Gink, a famous artist. It started with the use of long legged Japanese Bantam Frizzle. It took several years to create but, between 1989 and 1991, the Frizzle Poland became recognised giving us a superb new breed. Today the popularity of the Frizzle Poland is extremely high and is now also standardised by the British Poultry Club.
Rate:  (4.3)
Location: Birds & Bats
Aggressive Eagle Captured
A man found an eagle's egg and put it in a nest of a barnyard hen. The eaglet hatched with the brood of chicks and grew up with them. All his life the eagle did what the barnyard chicks did, thinking he was a barnyard chicken. He scratched the earth for worms and insects. He clucked and cackled. And he would thrash his wings and fly a few feet into the air. Years passed and the eagle grew very old. One day he saw a magnificent bird above him in the cloudless sky. It glided in graceful majesty among the powerful wind currents, with scarcely a beat on his strong golden wings. The ol...
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Location: Birds & Bats
"Telepathic" Parrot Sparks Rethink
A parrot with a 950-word vocabulary, a sense of humour and alleged telepathic powers is forcing a rethink of the scope for animals and humans to communicate. The 6-year-old captive-bred African grey called N'kisi is one of the most advanced users of human language in the animal world. The bird uses words in context, with past, present and future verb tenses. And, like small children, it resorts to creativity to describe new ideas - for instance saying "flied" for flew and inventing the phrase "pretty smell medicine" to indicate the aromatherapy oils used by his owner, a New York-based a...
Rate:  (2.2)
Location: Birds & Bats
China Sets Up Quack Squad
by David Rennie
An army of 700,000 specially trained ducks and chickens has been mobilised to help fight China's biggest locust plague in 25 years. The birds, which are taught to pursue and eat locusts at the sound of a whistle, are part of a national campaign that includes 280,000 people backed by crop-dusting planes and special locust-killing micro-organisms imported from Britain. Swarms of locusts have destroyed more than 1.6 million hectares of crops in 11 provinces in the north and east of China, and 3.8 million hectares of grassland in the far western region of Xinjiang. The birds are used in Xin...
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Location: Birds & Bats
Arctic Fox (Alopex lagopus)
A shortened snout and tiny round ears (smallest among foxes) help the arctic fox reduce heat loss, hair on the soles of its feet insulate against the cold ground, and a very thick winter fur keeps it so warm that it doesn't begin to shiver until the temperature drops to about minus ninety degrees Fahrenheit (-70C). This fox is the only canid with a coat that changes color seasonally; its winter coat is white and its summer coat is blue-gray or gray-brown. A nocturnal burrower, the arctic fox is occasionally seen by day hunting small mammals. Its diet also includes birds and th...
Rate:  (5)
Location: Foxes & Wolves
Giant Panda
Reclusive herbivores, giant pandas once enjoyed a wide range in southern China. However, habitat destruction and poaching for their valuable fur have killed off most of them, leaving only about one thousand in the wild. The ancestors of the giant panda were carnivores, but its diet has evolved into one of mostly stalks and roots of the slow-growing, nutrient-poor bamboo. It spends ten to sixteen hours a day eating the twenty to forty pounds (9 to 18 kg) of bamboo it needs for its daily quota. It forages over a large area to get enough; a typical home range is about 1.5 to 2.5 squar...
Rate:  (4)
Location: Bears
Lion
Social groups of lions, called prides, are composed of one to three males, two to fifteen females, and their offspring. Sometimes young males form their own satellite group. The males protect the territory and get to eat first; the lionesses do most of the hunting. They generally stalk and chase their prey, killing with a bite to the neck although they can also kill with a single back-breaking swat of the paw. Lions usually hunt at night and spend almost twenty hours a day sleeping or lounging with their playful cubs.
Rate:  (3.5)
Location: Big Cats
Day Gecko (Phelsuma madagascariensis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Geckonidae
The day gecko has a flat body covered with smooth skin and small scales. It has a relatively large head and round, large, vividly colored eyes covered by a transparent, fixed plate and no eyelids. The day gecko usually grows to between 4 and 6 inches long; its tail makes up roughly half that length. Its coloring ranges from olive green to turquoise, and it usually has red spots on its back. Young are born with a yellowish-green head, and brown neck and back with a series of light bars.
Rate:  (3.8)
Location: Lizards
Vicuña
Vicuñas are the smallest members of the camel family, Camelidae. These social animals live in family groups of up to twenty-five individuals, which usually consist of one dominant male and his harem of females and their young. The male is extremely protective of his harem. He has a specialized call to warn of potential predators and he fights with other males bouts in which, among other things, the opponents may spit at each other. Vicuñas descend from the hills during the day to feed on grasses and other vegetation, then return to the hills to sleep. They are n...
Rate:  (3.2)
Camels
A pair of dromedary camels named Teela and Dajarra get along quite well in their sandy Australian enclosure. Steve and Terri happened across Dajarra, an orphaned calf, while traveling in the Australian outback. Together they loaded the 4-month-old camel into Steve's four-wheel drive and took her back to the Australia Zoo. There, Dajarra was bottle-fed 3 liters of milk seven times a day for 18 months. Aside from her daily feedings, Dajarra was basically allowed to do as she pleased around the zoo.
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Kirk's Dikdik (Madoqua kirkii)
This small desert antelope has a flexible snout, or proboscis, lined with numerous blood vessels that serves as a heat exchanger. Cooled blood then passes directly to the brain, protecting this vital organ from increased body temperature in the heat of the day. The dikdik may be active by day or night and is usually about when the moon is full. It eats shoots and leaves of shrubs and succulents. Family groups, consisting of an adult pair and their young, live in well-defined territories that they protect from neighboring families. Dung, urine, and secretions from facial glands ...
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Total results: 14