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Lizards




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Frill-necked Lizard
The Frill-necked Lizard, or Frilled Lizard also known as the Frilled Dragon, (Chlamydosaurus kingii) is so called because of the large ruff of skin which usually lies folded back against its head and neck. The neck frill is supported by long spines of cartilage, and when the lizard is frightened, it gapes its mouth showing a bright pink or yellow lining, and the frill flares out, displaying bright orange and red scales. The frill may also aid in thermoregulation. They may grow up to one metre in total length. They often walk quadrupedally when on the ground. When frightened they begin to r...
Rate:  (4)
Tuataras (Sphenodon punctatus)
The two recognized species of tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus and Sphenodon guntheri) are found on approximately 30 small, relatively inaccesible, islands off the coast of New Zealand. The species was once widely distributed throughout New Zealand, but became extinct on the mainland before the arrival of European settlers
Rate:  (3.4)
Malayan Water Monitor (Varanus salvator)
Order: Squamata, Family: Varanidae
The Malayan water monitor grows from 7 to 9 feet in length and weighs 50 to 75 pounds. Blue-black with yellow stripes and spots, it has a dirty white or yellow throat, and its tail is banded with yellow and black. The water monitor is similar in appearance to a crocodile but has a shorter snout and more rounded body. Its strong legs each come equipped with five well-developed claws. It has long, sharp, backwardly curved teeth; a long, whip-like tail; and a very long neck with an elongated snout and nostrils close to the end of its nose.
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Spiny-Tailed Iguana (Ctenosaura similis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Iguanidae
The spiny-tailed iguana is found throughout Mexico, large areas in Central America and islands adjacent to Panama. Spiny-tailed iguanas are large, bulky lizards with adult males reaching up to 18 inches long with an 18-inch tail.
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Rhinoceros Iguana (Cyclura cornuta)
Order: Squamata, Family: Iguanidae
The rhinoceros iguana is found only on the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean Sea. A closely related species or subspecies (scientific opinions vary) was found on Navassa Island, but is now believed extinct. There is a living subspecies on Mona Island, near Puerto Rico.
Rate:  (3.6)
Komodo Dragon / Komodo Monitor / Ora (Varanus komodoensis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Varanidae
Male Komodo dragons typically grow to 7 to 9 feet in length and weigh approximately 200 pounds. However, they can weigh more than 350 pounds and grow to over 10 feet long; females grow to 6 to 8 feet. Females are olive-brown with yellow patches on the throat; males are much larger and vary in color from dark gray to brick red; young are colorful, with hues of yellow, green and white banding and dots on a dark background. The Komodo's tail makes up half its body length. It has a long neck; strong, sharp claws; 52 razor-sharp serrated teeth; and a long, yellow tongue.
Rate:  (4.5)
Inland Bearded Dragon (Pogona vitticeps)
Order: Squamata, Family: Agamidae
The inland bearded dragon has a wide natural distribution in eastern and central Australia. They are found from the eastern half of south Australia to the southeastern Northern Territory. Inland bearded dragons are 13 to 24 inches long, including the tail.
Rate:  (4.2)
Gila Monster (Heloderma suspectum)
Order: Squamata, Family: Helodermatidae
The Gila monster is the largest lizard native to the United States. It is one of only two types of poisonous lizard. It is large and stout, with short legs and strong claws, and a short, thick sausage-shaped tail. Its head is large, and it has wide jaws containing sharp teeth and venom glands in the lower jaw. Gilas measure 12 to 24 inches long and weigh 2 to 3 pounds. Its scales are beaded pink, yellow, orange and black. It has a black face and feet.
Rate:  (3.3)
Day Gecko (Phelsuma madagascariensis)
Order: Squamata, Family: Geckonidae
The day gecko has a flat body covered with smooth skin and small scales. It has a relatively large head and round, large, vividly colored eyes covered by a transparent, fixed plate and no eyelids. The day gecko usually grows to between 4 and 6 inches long; its tail makes up roughly half that length. Its coloring ranges from olive green to turquoise, and it usually has red spots on its back. Young are born with a yellowish-green head, and brown neck and back with a series of light bars.
Rate:  (3.8)
Skinks
A large, ever-expanding family of Cunningham's skinks lives at the Australia Zoo, where they enjoy catching sun rays and munching on hibiscus flowers. Native to southern Australia, Cunningham's skinks are often found in elevated ranges, basking in the sun on boulders and large, rocky outcrops. They are never far from shelter or a crevice in which to hide. Like other Australian skinks, they are chunky, have a thick neck, muscular limbs and a torso that is squarish in cross-section. Their skin is cloaked in scales that end in sharp, rigid points. When threatened, a Cunningham...
Rate:  (3.8)
Chameleon (Chamaeleo)
Order: Squamata, Family: Chamaeleoninae
The chameleon has zygodactylous toes (fused into opposed bundles of two and three). It has a long, slender, extensile tongue; independently movable bulged eyes; and a prehensile (grasping) tail. Its body is flattened from side to side. Chameleons usually grow to between 7 and 10 inches in length.
Rate:  (4.1)
Blotched Blue-Tongued Lizard (Tiliqua nigrolutea)
Order: Squamata, Family: Scincidae
The blotched blue-tongued lizard resides in southern parts of the Australian state of New South Wales and a smidgeon of the neighboring state of South Australia. It is restricted to the highland areas between the Victorian border and the Blue Mountains. It also occurs on Tasmania and the islands of the Bass Strait.
Rate:  (4.1)
Pink Fairy Armadillo
The Pink Fairy Armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus) or Pichiciego is the smallest species of armadillo (mammals of the family Dasypodidae, mostly known for having a bony armor shell). It is approximately 90-115 mm (3?-4?") long excluding the tail, and is pale rose or pink in color. It is found in central Argentina where it inhabits dry grasslands and sandy plains with thorn bushes and cacti. It has the ability to bury itself completely in a matter of seconds if frightened. The Pink Fairy Armadillo burrows small holes near ant colonies in dry dirt. It feeds mainly on ants and ant larvae near ...
Rate:  (3.5)
Blue Tongued Lizard
Order: Squamata, Family: Scincidae
Blue-tongued lizards are the largest members of the skink family (Scincidae). Skink lizards have overlapping scales that are usually smooth and contain small plates of bone. There are more than 300 species of skinks in Australia. Australia has six species of blue-tongued lizards and three are common and widespread in New South Wales. The Eastern Blue-tongue (Tiliqua scincoides scincoides) occurs throughout much of the state, west to about Cobar but the Blotched Blue-tongue (Tiliqua nigrolutea) is restricted to highland areas from the Victorian border to the Blue Mountains. The Shingleback ...
Rate:  (4.1)