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Water Life

Water Life
Under The Sea / Raven Symone The seaweed is always greener / In somebody else's lake You dream about going up there / But that is a big mistake Just look at the world around you / Right here on the ocean floor Such wonderful things surround you / What more is you lookin' for? Under the sea, under the sea Darling it's better down where it's wetter / Take it from me Up on the shore they work all day / Out in the sun they slave away While we're devoting full time to floating / Under the sea, ha ha... Down here all the fish is happy / As after the waves they roll The fish on the land ain't happy / They sad 'cause they in the bowl! But fish in the bowl is lucky / They in for a worser fate One day when the boss get hungry / Guess who goin' be on the plate?




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West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus Linnaeus)
Order: Sirenia, Family: Trichechidae
A large, grayish, nearly hairless, aquatic mammal without hind limbs; tail broadened into a horizontal, rounded paddle; front limbs paddlelike. Dental formula: I 2/2 (nonfunctional), C 0/0, Pm 0/0, M 6/6 (variable and continuously being replaced) X 2 = 32. Total length of adults, up to 3.5 m; weight, up to 1,000 kg. Distribution in Texas: West Indian manatees are found in rivers, estuaries, and coastal areas of the tropical and subtropical New World from the southeastern United States coast along Central America and the West Indies to the northern coastline of South America. Manatees are ex...
Rate:  (3.4)
Giant Otter / Brazilian Otter / River Wolf (Pteronura brasiliensis)
Order: Carnivora, Family: Mustelidae
Giant otters can grow up to 6 feet long, with males usually longer than females. Male otters weigh between 217 and 267 pounds, and females average 184 to 217 pounds. The giant otter has a round head with small, low-set ears. It has large eyes; short, thick legs; a flattened tail; and large webbed feet equipped with strong claws. Its thick, water-repellent coat is a very dark burnt umber, with pale markings on the throat.
Rate:  (3.9)
Silver Salmon
Order: Salmoniformes, Family: Salmonidae
Typically spend the first year of their life in fresh water. Upon moving to the ocean, growth increases dramatically. At about the third year, coho salmon reach maturity. They weigh from 6 to 12 pounds and can be up to 38 inches in length. Oncorhynchus kisutch are deep-bodied salmon with unique color characteristics. The dorsal surface is a metallic blue while the sides are a silver color. Black spots appear on the back and upper lobe of the caudal fin. A lateral line is also present. The line is curved toward the front of the fish and straightens out as it approaches the back of the f...
Rate:  (2.8)
Harp Seal
Harp seals migrate in large groups as much as five thousand miles (8,000 km) from feeding grounds in the north to breeding grounds in the south. They spend about half the year in the north, feeding on fish and invertebrates. In the spring, thousands of females congregate on pack ice to give birth and nurse their white-furred pups. Following weaning, the pups shed their white fur, which is replaced by silver-gray pelage with dark spots. After successive molts, the spots are replaced by the typical harp-shaped marking on the back. By June the harp seals are moving northward again...
Rate:  (2.6)
Leopard Seal
This seal gets its common name from the numerous dark spots on its coat. The name leopard seal, though, is sometimes also applied to other spotted seals, such as the Weddell's seal. A solitary seal, it has huge canine teeth and massive jaws. Generally it feeds on krill, which it strains from the water with its specialized teeth. It is the only seal that preys on warm-blooded animals; it catches penguins and even other seals, which it pursues underwater. A fast swimmer, it also preys on fish and squid.
Rate:  (3.7)
Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus)
Order: Carnivora , Family: Otariidae
The Steller sea lion is the largest of five species of seals belonging to the family Otariidae (eared seals). Its yellowish-buff fur is made up of short coarse hair lacking a distinct undercoat. The sea lion's flippers are longer than those of true or earless seals. Sea lions can rotate their hind flippers forward in order to have full use of all four limbs on land. Male Steller sea lions are much larger than females, with males averaging 9 1/4 feet long and females 7 1/2 feet. The average male weighs 1,250 pounds, while the average female is only 580 pounds. Males have a mane ...
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What makes dolphins so smart?
Well, their brains, of course. Dolphins have large brains for their bodies in fact, a bottlenose dolphin is second only to humans in the ratio of brain size to body size. Researchers have also pointed to the parallels in the organization of dolphin and primate brains as more evidence of high intelligence in dolphins. Some have gone so far as to suggest that dolphins actually have a language that humans simply cannot comprehend.
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Did you know that Dolphins...
Unlike any other mammal, dolphin babies are born tail first! Dolphins have very little sense of smell! A mother dolphin will stay with a calf for two to three years! Dolphins, like cows, have two stomachs one for storing food and one for digesting it!
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Striped Dolphin
Identified by the lateral stripes that originate at their eyes, the striped dolphins are sometimes seen swimming alongside large ships off California and in the Atlantic, a behavior known as bow-riding. In the eastern tropical Pacific, where they are also found, they tend to be shyer. These dolphins are energetic swimmers, sometimes moving upside down and jumping as high as twenty feet (6 m) out of the water to do backward somersaults. Social animals, they are commonly found in schools of up to five hundred individuals. The size of the school depends on geographic location; tho...
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Goldfish (Carassius auratus)
Order: Cypriniformes, Family: Cyprinidae
Although goldfishes originated in China, they have now spread worldwide in aquariums, ornamental pools, and into the wild. In the wild, goldfish can be found in slow-moving, freshwater bodies of water. As with their close relative the carp, they thrive in slightly murky water. In captivity, an aquarium with live plants and a dirt bottom is ideal. Bi-weekly water changes are a good idea as a goldfish tank is hard to keep clean. Live plants must be replaced fairly regularly; goldfish enjoy eating them. Small pebbles are a suitable substitute for the pond-like bottom. Typically, goldfish will s...
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Fiddler Crab (Uca princeps)
Order: Decapoda, Family: Ocypodidea
Fiddler crabs are small, semi-terrestrial crabs; male fiddlers have one claw that is much larger than the other, while females have equal-sized claws. The common English name, fiddler crab, comes from the manner in which male crabs feed; male crabs move their small claw from the ground to their mouth, causing them to resemble someone sweeping a bow (the small claw) across a fiddle (the large claw). The male's large claw measures about 1 to 2 inches long, and is often as large and heavy as the rest of the crab's body. It also often contrasts in color with the rest of the crab'...
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Gooseneck Barnacle (Pollicipes polymerus)
Order: Thoracica, Family: Scalpellidae
The gooseneck barnacle is found from the southern region of Alaska to Baja, California. The shell, or capitulum, of the gooseneck barnacle grows to be about two inches long. It is made up of small plates, which enclose its soft body. Inside the shell, the barnacle primarily consists of long segmented legs, intestines and stomach. The gonads are held within the stalk. The stalk also contains the gland that is used to produce the adhesive that allows barnacles to attach to rocks so well.
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North Pacific Giant Octopus (Octopus dofleini)
Order: Octopoda, Family: Octopodidae
The giant octopus is the largest of all octopods, with a 31 feet arm span. Like all Octopus, they have 8 long arms, which suckers. This octopus typically lives off the northern coast of California and north toward Alaska and Japan.
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Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris)
Order: Carnivora, Family: Mustelidae
Male sea otters average 5 feet and 70 pounds; females average 4 feet and 60 pounds. They are dark brown with lighter heads that turn grayish white with age. Sea Otters live in shallow coastal waters, especially kelp beds.
Rate:  (4.4)
West Indian Manatee
The manatee, often called the sea cow, is the only exclusively herbivorous marine mammal. It grazes on all kinds of aquatic plants, especially marine sea grasses, assisted by its large prehensile lips, which are studded with bristles. During the day, it is frequently found close to the surface, sleeping within the top three to ten feet (1 to 3 m). Occasionally it swims down to thirty feet (10 m), propelling itself along with the aid of its large flat tail, which it also uses as a rudder. When feeding, which it usually does at night, it walks along the bottom using its fore limbs. I...
Rate:  (4.6)
Amazon Ox Manatee (Trichechus inunguis)
Order: Sirenia, Family: Trichechidae
The Amazon Basin of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana and Peru. The Amazon ox manatee is gray and bears a white patch on its chest or several white markings on its chest and abdomen. Its body is covered with fine hairs and its upper and lower lips are covered with thick bristles. It has two mammary glands near its armpits.
Rate:  (3.8)
Yeti Crab
Kiwa hirsuta is a crustacean discovered in 2005 in the South Pacific Ocean. This decapod, which is approximately 15 cm (6 inches) long, is notable for the quantity of silky blond setae (resembling fur) covering its pereiopods (thoracic legs, including claws). Its discoverers dubbed it the "yeti lobster" or "yeti crab"[2]. K. hirsuta was discovered in March 2005 by a group organised by Robert Vrijenhoek of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in Monterey, California, using the submarine DSV Alvin, operating from RV Atlantis[3]. The discovery was announced on the 7th of March, 2006. ...
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Leafy seadragon (Phycodurus eques)
Named after the dragons of Chinese mythology, Leafy seadragons (Phycodurus eques) resemble a piece of drifting seaweed as they float in the seaweed-filled water. The Leafy seadragon, with green, orange and gold hues along its body, is covered with leaf-like appendages, making it remarkably camouflaged. Only the fluttering of tiny fins or the moving of an independently swiveling eye, reveals its presence. Like the seahorse, the male seadragon carries as many as 150-200 eggs. After being deposited by the female, the eggs are carried in the honeycomb-shaped area (known as the brood patch) und...
Rate:  (3.4)
Hagfish
Hagfish are marine craniates of the class Myxini, also known as Hyperotreti. Despite their name, there is some debate about whether they are strictly fish (as there is for lampreys), since they belong to a much more primitive lineage than any other group that is commonly defined fish (Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes). Their unusual feeding habits and slime-producing capabilities have led members of the scientific and popular media to dub the hagfish as the most "disgusting" of all sea creatures.
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Blobfish (Psychrolutes marcidus)
The blobfish (Psychrolutes marcidus) is a fish that inhabits the deep waters off the coasts of Australia and Tasmania. Due to the inaccessibility of its habitat, it is rarely seen by humans. Blobfish are found at depths where the pressure is several dozens of times higher than at sea level, which would likely make gas bladders inefficient. To remain buoyant, the flesh of the blobfish is primarily a gelatinous mass with a density slightly less than water; this allows the fish to float above the sea floor without expending energy on swimming. The relative lack of muscle is not a disadvantage...
Rate:  (3.5)