Animals and Pets pictures
Search













Ads By Google


What are you looking for?
Animals Information
Animals Pictures
Animals Videos
I got here by mistake...



Spiders & Insects

Spiders & Insects
Spiders are arachnids not insects, but both spiders and insects belong to the largest group of animals on Earth, the arthropods - animals with hard external skeletons and jointed limbs (greek arthro = joint, podos = footed). What are the differences between spiders and insects? Spiders have two main body parts, eight walking legs, simple eyes and piercing jaws (fangs), abdominal silk spinning organs, anterior abdominal genital opening. Insects have three main body parts, six walking legs, compound eyes, antennae, chewing jaws (mandibles - often secondarily modified), posterior abdominal genital opening. Spiders can't fly. Many insects can fly. Spiders were among the earliest animals to live on land. Despite this their fossil record is relatively poor. They probably evolved about 400 million years ago from thick-waisted arachnid ancestors that were not long emerged from life in water. The first definite spiders, thin-waisted arachnids with abdominal segmentation and silk producing spinnerets, are known from fossils like Attercopus fimbriungus. This spider lived 380 million years ago during the Devonian Period, more than 150 million years before the dinosaurs. Most of the early segmented fossil spiders belonged to the Mesothelae, a group of primitive spiders with the spinnerets placed underneath the middle of the abdomen (rather than at the end as in 'modern' spiders). They were probably ground dwelling predators, living in the giant clubmoss and fern forests of the mid-late Palaeozoic, where they were presumably predators of other primitive arthropods (like cockroaches, giant silverfish, slaters and millipedes). Silk may have been used simply as a protective covering for the eggs, a lining for a retreat hole, and later perhaps for simple ground sheet web and trapdoor construction.




Add To Google Bookmarks Add To Del.icio.us Add To digg Add To Yahoo My Web Add To Technorati Add To Stumble Upon Add To blinklist Add To reddit Add To Feed Me Links Add To Newsvine Add To Ma.gnolia Add To RawSugar Add To Squidoo Add To Spurl Add To Netvouz Add To Simpy Add To Co.mments Add To Scuttle

Family Hexathelidae
Funnel-web spiders, the most notorious members of our spider fauna, are found only in eastern Australia. There are at least 40 species currently placed in two genera: Hadronyche and Atrax. They are medium to large spiders, varying from 1-5 cm body length. Males are more lightly built than females. Body colour can vary from black to brown but the hard carapace covering the front part of the body is always sparsely haired and glossy. The lateral pair of spinning organs (spinnerets) at the end of the abdomen are longer and easily visible in Atrax spp. but often shorter in Hadronyche spp. Not ...
Rate:  (4.3)
White-Tailed spiders
Family Lamponidae
There are many species of white-tailed spiders and they are found throughout Australia. Some species are common in urban areas and are often seen in houses. White-tailed spiders usually wander at night, hunting and eating other spiders. The two common species, the Southern and Eastern White-tailed Spiders, Lampona cylindrata and L. murina, are similar in appearance and have overlapping distributions in the south-eastern Australia. Their bites have been controversially and often incorrectly implicated in causing ulceration in humans. White-tailed spiders are vagrant hunters that live beneath...
Rate:  (3.8)
Predators and Parasites
Predators and parasites are those bugs that eat other bugs. Why are they important? It has to do with the way we grow our food crops and timber species in the most sustainable way. You see, all creatures on our planet belong to a web of life, or ecological system. We are all familiar with the following simple relationship: antelopes eat grass and lions eat the antelopes. In other words, there's always an animal that eats another animal.
Rate:  (4.4)
High-Tech Bugs
Bugs are and will continue to play a big role in the development of future human technology: Looking for a great new air-conditioning system that doesn't require power to run? Some African termite species build huge mounds of clay and dirt especially for that purpose. Their invention is millions of years old and has stood the test of time.
Rate:  (2.6)
Cockroaches
Cockroaches carry an old stigma of "bad housekeeping." It may come as a bit of a surprise that roaches have been on this planet now for more than 300 million years! Humans only arrived a mere million years ago and settlements based on agriculture began springing up about 12,000 years ago.
Rate:  
Pollinators
Pollinators are just as much part of my "favorite" list of invertebrates. After all, they are the ones that tirelessly visit flowers, one after the other, with the idea of extracting nectar and pollen from these showy plant genitalia.
Rate:  (2.3)
Pantry Bugs
Pantry insects are those creatures that you find in the cupboard where you store your food. Moths, beetles, weevils...everybody seems to live inside your pantry, and some of the stored foods look really awful as a result of their activity. Bugs have been living with us ever since we started to practice the art of keeping food items in a "safe place" for later consumption. It especially became a great habit when we got into agriculture and horticulture, producing far more than we can consume in the near future.
Rate:  
Spiders
Spiders can send a chill down a person's back; oh yes, arachnophobia can be a rotten affliction and there's no need to feel ashamed about being arachnophobic in the true sense of the medical word. But the problem that the Bugman faces is that spiders should be viewed with a great deal of respect and awe, simply because they are amazing creatures and thereâs much more to them than we see at first sight of those eight-legged, hairy predators.
Rate:  (3)
Maggots
Maggots have been put on this planet to recycle waste material. These babies of houseflies tunnel through organic waste and slimy rubbish 24/7 and break it down to much smaller bits that are perfect fodder for smaller bugs and bacteria.
Rate:  
Ants
Ants are often thought of as a real nuisance. These creatures gather their food in your garden or even your house it all depends on what type of food they feed on and what you provide them with. Some species feed on protein debris, thereby cleaning the earth of miscellaneous dead insects and other animals, so these bodies don't lay around for years and years.
Rate:  
Spiders - Survival strategies
Spiders use many strategies to protect themselves from their enemies. One of the most amazing of these is called autotomy. This is the spider's ability to self-amputate a leg that has been grabbed by a bird or other predator. Usually the leg breaks off close to the body, at the coxa-trochanter joint. Even more amazingly, juvenile spiders can regenerate their legs - a tiny, segmented leg grows within the coxal stump and appears at the next moult. Other strategies include behavioural ploys, like direct threat displays of warning colours on the spider's body, or escaping a predator by...
Rate:  
Carpet Beetles and Moths
Carpet beetles and clothes moths aim for our woollen fabrics and furnishings. They're just doing what comes naturally. They were born to recycle the fur, feathers and even skins of dead animals. Have you ever tried to eat wool? The reality is you can't, simply because wool is made of keratin, a large and long molecule that is hard to break down. There are very few animals that can actually digest and break down keratin, and carpet beetles and clothes moth caterpillars are some of those specialists.
Rate: