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Search results for "burmese"





Dealing with non-venomous snake bites
To start out with, I feel that most cases of snakebite are NOT the snake's fault, but rather the fault of the person who is working with or around the snake. People can easily avoid snakebites by using some common sense. Over the years, several snakes have bitten me. I have suffered bites from various rat snakes, kingsnakes, racers, gophers, water, garters, ribbons, Burmese pythons, ball pythons, and rosy boas. I did have a female western hognose snake that seemed to have a strange fascination with wanting to chew on my fingers; however, I have never allowed her the opportunity to latch...
Rate:  (4.1)
Tonkinese
While planned breeding of the Tonkinese didn’t begin until the 1960s, early versions of the breed probably have been around for hundreds of years. Since Burmese cats, originally called “Copper cats” in their native land of Southeast Asia, existed in the same general regions as the Siamese for centuries, unplanned or intentional outcrossings seem likely.
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European Burmese
The European Burmese is an elegant cat of foreign type, which is positive and individual to the breed. Any suggestion of either Siamese type or the cobbiness of the British Shorthair must be regarded as a fault.
Rate:  (2.6)
Burmese
The modern Burmese saga began in 1930 with a female cat named Wong Mau. This brown feline was brought to the United States from Yangon, Myanmar (the former Rangoon, Burma). Some sources say Wong Mau was brought to the United States by a sailor and was given to a U.S. Navy doctor named Dr. Joseph Thompson. Other sources say that Dr. Thompson himself brought Wong Mau back from Myanmar. The latter is likely true, given Dr. Thompson’s interest in the Far East and its cats.
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Bombay
The Bombay was created in the 1950s by the late Nikki Horner, an American breeder who wanted to develop a cat that possessed the conformation of the Burmese but with a sleek black coat and copper eyes instead of brown fur and yellow eyes—sort of a pint-sized panther. She named the breed after Bombay, India, land of the black leopard. She first attempted to breed a female Burmese to a black American Shorthair. The results were disappointing; they looked more like poor American Shorthairs than anything else.
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Burmese Python / Asiatic Rock Python (Python molurus bivittatus)
Order: Squamata, Family: Pythonidae
The Burmese python is the largest subspecies of the Indian python. Large and muscular, this python species typically grows to 18 to 33 feet in length and weighs between 200 and 300 pounds. The Burmese python is uniformly pale tan, yellow-brown or gray with reddish-brown blotches outlined in cream or gold. It has a yellow or white belly, and orange eyes with vertical pupils and no eyelids. The Burmese python's large head is distinctly wider than its neck.
Rate:  (3)


Total results: 6