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Sharks & Rays
Sharks can find prey by following the electrical impulses that animals emit, and...
Big Cats
Big cat refers to large wild felids of the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe. A...
Crocodiles & Alligators


Turtles as Pets: Important Issues
Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.
Getting a pet is always a very important decision and one that should be made only when you are aware of what having this pet will entail. What type of turtle, sources of turtles, and estimates of the time and money it will take to properly care for the turtle are all important considerations. But before you go out and buy a turtle, you need to ask yourself some very important questions.
Rate:  (4.2)
Location: Turtles
When  pugs attack
Our pug Bosley loves to attack small children
Rate:  (3.6)
Location: Movies / Videos
Tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier)
The tiger shark is considered one of the most dangerous sharks. It is about 18 feet long and inhabits shallower water, often where people swim. The diet of tiger sharks varies widely and includes all types of sea life and even garbage. The tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier (Peron & LeSueur), is a large (up to 18ft) predator found in tropical and subtropical waters worldwide. Tiger sharks are one of three main shark species known to attack humans, and are responsible for most shark attacks in Hawaii. Less than one shark attack occurs per year on average in Hawaii (compared to an annual averag...
Rate:  (3.4)
Location: Sharks & Rays
Bull Shark (Carcharhinus leucas)
Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Carcharhinidae
The bull shark gets its name from its snout, which is wider than it is long. It is possibly more dangerous to humans than the great white shark because it lives in shallow, murky water in areas where people swim. The real shark attacks on which the movie and book Jaws were based were done by a bull shark.
Rate:  (4.2)
Location: Sharks & Rays
Wire Fox Terrier
The ultimate show dog, the wire fox terrier has its roots as an effective hunting dog. Its forebears were adept at bolting and perhaps dispatching game, especially fox that had gone to ground. Some speculation exists that the smooth and wire fox terriers arose from distinct backgrounds, with the wire descending from the rough-coated black and tan terrier of Wales. The wire entered the show ring about 15 to 20 years after the smooth made its debut.
Rate:  (3.7)
Irish Terrier
The quintessential long-legged terrier, the Irish terrier is also one of the oldest terrier breeds. Its creation is not documented, but it may have descended from the old black and tan terrier and a larger but racier solid wheaten-colored terrier, both of which were found in Ireland and used for hunting fox, otter and vermin. Its similarity to the Irish wolfhound has led to conjecture that it may have descended at least in part from that breed. The Irish terrier is the raciest member of the terrier group, with a longer body and longer legs than the other terriers.
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Bull Terrier
Bull-baiting and dog fighting were long considered great entertainment by many Europeans, and patrons were constantly trying crosses to achieve the ultimate fighting dog. Around 1835, a cross between a bulldog and the old English terrier produced a particularly adept pit dog known as the "bull and terrier." A later cross to the Spanish pointer added needed size, and the result was a tenacious, strong, yet agile dog that came to dominate the pits. As interest in the exhibition of dogs grew in England, little attention was paid to these dogs so long associated with the lower echelons of society.
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Maltese / Bichon Maltiase
The Maltese is the most ancient of the European toy breeds, and among the oldest of all breeds. The island of Malta was an early trading port, visited by Phoenician sailors by 1500 B.C. Maltese dogs are specifically mentioned in writings as early as 300 B.C. Greek art includes dogs of Maltese type from the fifth century on; there is evidence that tombs were even erected to favor Maltese. Although the dogs were often exported and subsequently widely distributed throughout Europe and Asia, the core population on Malta remained relatively isolated from other dogs, resulting in this distinctive do...
Rate:  (3.9)
Miniature Pinscher
The miniature pinscher is not a miniature version of the Doberman pinscher. In fact, it is the older of the two breeds. Clues about the min pin's origin are scarce, but it is noteworthy that a cat-sized red dog resembling a min pin is depicted in a 17th-century painting. By the 19th century, several paintings include dogs of distinct the min pin type. These dogs probably resulted from crossing a small shorthaired terrier (German pinscher) with the dachshund and Italian greyhound.
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Silky Terrier
In the late 1800s, Yorkshire terriers were brought to Australia from England. These dogs had striking steel-blue and tan coat coloration and were bred with the native blue and tan Australian terriers in an effort to improve the latter's coat color while retaining its more robust conformation. Both the Yorkshire terrier and the Australian terrier were rather recent developments from crosses of a number of other terrier breeds. Some of the descendents from these crosses were shown as Yorkshire terriers and some as Australian terriers.
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Yorkshire Terrier
The Yorkshire Terrier doesn't look like a product of the working class, nor does it look like a ratter, but it is both. In fact, the Yorkshire area of England is known for producing fine animals, and it is thought that the Yorkie was no accident but rather the result of purposeful crosses between a variety of terriers, probably including the Waterside Terrier, Clydesdale Terrier, Paisley Terrier, rough-coated English Black and Tan Terrier, and perhaps even the Skye Terrier, Dandie Dinmont Terrier, and Maltese.
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Amstaff - American Staffordshire Terrier
The American Staffordshire terrier and the Staffordshire bull terrier descended from the same lines. The prototype originally sprang from crossing the old type of bulldog with some old terrier types, probably the English sooth terrier. The result was aptly called the "bull and terrier," later to be dubbed the Staffordshire bull terrier. The dogs gained fame among fanciers of dog fighting, a popular sport despite its having been declared illegal. Their fighting ability gained them passage to America in the late 1800s, where they dominated the fighting "pits." Here they became known as the pit b...
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French Bulldog
In the 19th century, the bulldog was fairly popular in England, especially around Nottingham. Some of these bulldogs were quite small, weighing less than 25 pounds. When many of the lace workers of the region went to France for work in the mid-1800s, they took their "toy" bulldogs with them. The French women, especially, were attracted to these little bulldogs, especially those with erect ears (a common but disliked feature in England). Dog dealers brought more of the clownish little dogs to France, where they soon became the rage of Paris.
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Airedale
Known as the "king of terriers," the Airedale is the tallest terrier. Like many terriers, it counts the old English, or black and tan, terrier as one of its primary progenitors. These medium-sized dogs were prized by Yorkshire hunters for hunting a variety of game from water rats to fox. Around the mid-1800s, some of these terriers around the River Aire in South Yorkshire were crossed with otterhounds in order to improve their hunting ability around water, as well as their scenting ability. The result was a dog adept at otter hunting, originally called the Bingley or Waterside terrier but reco...
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Staffordshire Bull Terrier
In the early 1800s, the sport of rat killing had become quite popular among the working classes. Bull-baiting, which had been popular in earlier times, did not lend itself to the cities, and fanciers of the rat pit became increasingly enamored of dog fighting as a more exciting alternative to rat killing. In their efforts to produce a fearless, quick, strong contender for the dog pit, they crossed the bulldog of the time with the black and tan terrier, thus producing the "bull and terrier." Selective breeding resulted in a small nimble dog with incredibly strong jaws.
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Bulldog
With the most distinctive mug in dogdom, the bulldog has an equally distinctive history. The bulldog's origin lies in the cruel sport of bull-baiting, which originated in England around the 13th century. The dog's purpose was to attack and madden the bull by grabbing it, usually by the nose, and not releasing its grip. Not only was this considered entertainment, but it also was believed that a bull's meat was tastier if the bull was baited before being butchered. Some bulldogs were also set against bears for bearbaiting, purely for entertainment.
Rate:  (4.8)
Bull Shark (Carcharhinus leucas)
Order: Carcharhiniformes, Family: Carcharhinidae
The bull Shark inhabits coastal waters in tropical and subtropical seas worldwide. The bull shark can be recognized by its unique body shape, which is much wider in comparison to its length than other sharks, and its snout, which is wider than it is long. These features give the bull shark an almost stout appearance.
Rate:  (3.2)
Location: Sharks & Rays
Great Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda)
Order: Perciformes, Family: Sphyraenidae
The great barracuda inhabits nearly all warm seas. They are found in the tropical regions of the Indo-Pacific and Atlantic oceans, with an absence only from the eastern Pacific. They have been found in the Red Sea and as far as the Bermudas in the western Atlantic. They have been seen as far north as Massachusetts.
Rate:  (3.8)
Location: Water Life


Total results: 18